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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 
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        • » Djiyadi: can we talk? A resource manual for sexual health workers who work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth

Djiyadi: can we talk? A resource manual for sexual health workers who work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth (2011)

Author

Australasian Society for HIV Medicine, National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Rioli D, Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

Publisher

Australasian Society for HIV Medicine

City

Sydney

Type

Handbook

 

Description

This manual has been developed to assist sexual health workers to provide youth centred, culturally sensitive sexual heatlh advice and care to young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It contains information and support material that seeks to promote positive sexual health among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people.

The resource begins by looking at sexual health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander society, focusing on issues such as sexually transmissible infections (STIs), blood-borne viruses (BBVs), and risk behaviours. Chapter 2 discusses issues related to being a sexual health worker, including different aspects of sexual health work. Chapter 3 focuses on educating groups and individuals in sexual health, and Chapter 4 looks at ways of improving access to sexual health services with attention to cultural respect and sensitivity, community involvement, and working holistically. The final two chapters of this resource discuss several sensitive issues in sexual health: taking a sexual history, contact tracing, child sexual abuse, and sexual assault.

Adapted from Australasian Society for HIV Medicine

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Last updated: 12 March 2012
 
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