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        • » Protracted bacterial bronchitis: long term outcomes and predictors of recurrence

Protracted bacterial bronchitis: long term outcomes and predictors of recurrence

 

Overview

The Menzies School of Health Research project Protracted bacterial bronchitis: long term outcomes and predictors of recurrence is being undertaken to improve the health outcomes for children with recurrent protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB). The examination of predictors of recurrent PBB may help identify children at most risk of recurrent episodes and this will provide clinically important information relating to their treatment. The research aims to:

The study will involve clinical follow up of children with PBB for 3-5 years. It will extend on previous work and will be the first study to clarify the clinical medium-term outcomes of the most common cause of chronic wet cough in children. The project commenced in 2013 and aims to run until 2015.

It is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in collaboration with Menzies School of Health Research, the University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, the University of Newcastle, Queensland Lung Transplant Service, Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, the Royal Adelaide Hospital and the Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute.

Abstracted adapted from Menzies School of Health Research

Contacts

Anne Chang
Project Manager
Menzies School of Health Research
PO Box 41096
Casuarina NT 0811
Ph: (08) 8922 8196 (Reception)
Fax: (08) 89275187
Email: anne.chang@menzies.edu.au

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Last updated: 20 March 2014
 
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