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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 
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        • » The DRUID follow up survey: diabetes and related disorders in urban Indigenous people in the Darwin region

The DRUID follow up survey: diabetes and related disorders in urban Indigenous people in the Darwin region

 

Overview

This study is a follow up to the DRUID study completed in 2009. The initial study investigated diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease and other health conditions to gain an understanding of the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people in an urban setting of Darwin, Northern Territory.

In this study researchers will look at how the health of the original participants has changed over time. The aim of the study is to also identify the factors that may predict who gets the diseases and who stays healthy. It is hoped that the results of this current study will help health professionals to diagnose and treat the risk factors earlier.

Abstract adapted from Menzies School of Health Research

Contacts

Dr Elizabeth Barr
Chief Investigator
Menzies School of Health Research
PO Box 41096
Casuarina NT 0811
Mobile: 043 784 3101 or 04DRUID101
Toll Free: 1800 761 882
Fax: (08) 8927 5197
Email: elizabeth.Barr@menzies.edu.au
Email: druid@menzies.edu.au

Related publications

Cunningham J, Maple-Brown L, Barr E, Tatipata S (2012)

Darwin Region Urban Indigenous Diabetes (DRUID): follow-up study.

The Chronicle; 24(3): 8-9

Barr E (2012)

Impaired glucose metabolism and other metabolic risk factors in the development of cardiovascular disease -findings from AusDiab and plans to follow-up DRUID.

: Menzies School of Health Research

Links

 
Last updated: 21 January 2014
 
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