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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin

Cancer Council NSW $2 million grant to cut Aboriginal cancer deaths

Date posted: 4 April 2013

Cancer Council NSW has been awarded a $2m grant over the next five years. A team of leading researchers will aim to cut the number of Aboriginal cancer deaths. The death rate from cancer is currently 60% higher in Aboriginal people than in non-Aboriginal people.

Lack of access to treatment centres and feelings of isolation while in hospital have been identified as possible barriers that prevent Aboriginal people from accessing the same level of healthcare as non-Aboriginal people.

‘The grant is aimed at making our health system work better to meet Aboriginal patients' needs. To do this successfully, we need to know more about what is happening now and how services could be improved.' said Professor Dianne O'Connell, Cancer Council NSW. ‘This research will identify how we can start to close this gap.'

Professor O'Connell is working with Chief Investigator Associate Professor Gail Garvey, from Menzies School of Health Research to bring together leading researchers, health service providers, policy-makers, consumer advocacy groups and Aboriginal groups in the fight against cancer.

Important areas that will be addressed include:

The project is a collaboration with Cancer Council NSW, University of Western Australia, Griffith University and James Cook University.

Cancer Council NSW would like to speak to Aboriginal people who have been diagnosed with cancer since July 2010. For contact information see contact details below.

Source: Cancer Council NSW


Cancer Council NSW
Aboriginal liaison officer
Ph: 1800 247 029 (free-call from fixed line phones)


Last updated: 4 April 2013
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