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Key references

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References for the key publications about the eye health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are listed here.

2013

Australian Bureau of Statistics (2013)

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey: first results, Australia, 2012-13.

Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This summary of the first findings from the 2012-13 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey provides information on long-term health conditions, health risk factors, selected social and emotional wellbeing indicators, health measurements, and health related actions for Indigenous Australian peoples. Information is included on Indigenous peoples living in remote and non-remote areas.

Abstract adapted from Australian Bureau of Statistics

The Kirby Institute (2013)

Australian trachoma surveillance report 2012.

Sydney: The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales

This report contains trachoma screening and management data for 2012 from the Northern Territory (NT), South Australia (SA), Western Australia (WA) and Queensland (Qld). A total of 195 (96%) of 204 designated at-risk communities were screened for trachoma during 2012, and data were analysed by region.

Children from 0-14 years were assessed for clean faces and active trachoma and adults aged 40 years and older were screened for trichiasis. Health promotion activities were also recorded.

Important findings from this report include:

  • an increase in screening coverage of communities in WA, SA and NT
  • a decrease in the national prevalence of trachoma in the 5-9 year age group, from 7% in 2011 to 4% in 2012
  • no active trachoma was detected in Queensland.

Trachoma surveillance and management has been undertaken since 2006 guided by the Communicable Disease Network of Australia (CDNA) Guidelines for the public management of trachoma in Australia 2006.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

2012

Taylor HR, Anjou MD, Boudville AI, McNeil RJ (2012)

The roadmap to close the gap for vision: full report.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population Health, The University of Melbourne

2011

Hsueh Y, Brando A, Dunt D, Anjou M, Taylor H (2011)

The cost to close the gap for vision.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, the University of Melbourne

This report summarises a study which determines the direct medical and associated non-medical costs of providing full access to eye care services for Indigenous people focusing on three main eye problems; cataract, refractive error, and diabetic retinopathy. Methods were developed in the study to estimate resources currently spent on these services and estimate what extra resources are needed to Close the gap for vision for Indigenous people for each state and territory in the next five years.

The report is part of a series produced by the Indigenous Eye Health Unit, University of Melbourne, following the National Indigenous eye health survey and Access to eye health services among Indigenous Australians reports.

Abstract adapted from the University of Melbourne

Jones JN, Henderson G, Poroch N, Anderson I, Taylor H (2011)

A critical history of Indigenous eye health policy-making : towards effective system reform.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, the University of Melbourne

This report documents the history of Indigenous eye health policy-making in Australia from the late 1970s' National trachoma and eye health program to the present time, with the aim of providing evidence to assist the Australian Government and the Council of Australian Governments in the system reform of Indigenous eye health. By undertaking a review of literature in the area of Indigenous eye health, and interviewing key stakeholders, the report:

  • describes the development of Indigenous eye health programs and policy
  • recognises the key barriers and catalysts to the development of effective programs and policy
  • identifies strategies to assist in the future system reform of Indigenous eye health.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Taylor HR, Dunt D, Hsueh Y, Brando A (2011)

Projected needs for eye care services for Indigenous Australians.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, the University of Melbourne

2010

Kelaher M, Ferdinand A, Ngo S, Tambuwla N, Taylor HR (2010)

Access to eye health services among Indigenous Australians: an area level analysis.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population Health

2009

Taylor H, Gruen R (2009)

Diabetic retinopathy: accuracy of screening methods for diabetic retinopathy: a systematic review.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population Health

Taylor HR, National Indigenous Eye Health Survey Team (2009)

National Indigenous eye health survey: minum barreng (tracking eyes): full report.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, The University of Melbourne

This report details the findings of the National Indigenous Eye Health Survey which was conducted in 2008 to define:

  • the extent of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • the causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • the impact of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

The survey was designed to plan and prioritise the effective delivery of eye care for Indigenous people. Overall 2,883 Indigenous people were examined. The report records the extent of eye health problems such as refractive error, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, blindness and trachoma.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Turner A, Mulholland W, Taylor HR (2009)

Outreach eye services in Australia.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit

2008

Couzos S, Taylor H, Wright H (2008)

Trachoma.

In: Couzos S, Murray R, eds. Aboriginal primary health care: an evidence-based approach. 3rd ed. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press: 708-731

2007

Wright HR (2007)

Trachoma in Australia: an evaluation of the SAFE strategy and the barriers to its implementation.

Doctor of Philosophy thesis, University of Melbourne: Melbourne

2006

Communicable Disease Network Australia (2006)

Guidelines for the public health management of trachoma in Australia.

Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing

These guidelines establish a minimum best-practice approach for the public health management of trachoma in Australia. The content includes a brief history of trachoma and discusses:

  • prevalence of trachoma in Australia
  • responsibility for trachoma control activities
  • the World Health Organization SAFE strategy
  • methods of educating the health workforce and engaging the community.

The guidelines acknowledge that appropriate engagement with the local community, both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people, is a pre-requisite to implementing the WHO SAFE (Surgery, Antibiotics, Facial cleanliness and Environmental improvement) strategy and therefore an essential part of effective trachoma control.

Abstract adapted from Communicable Disease Network Australia

2005

Commonwealth of Australia (2005)

National framework for action to promote eye health and prevent avoidable blindness and vision loss.

Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia

The National framework for action to promote eye health and prevent avoidable blindness and vision loss (National eye health framework) was developed in response to World Health Assembly resolution WHA 56.26 which calls on all member countries to develop national vision plans to eliminate avoidable blindness by the year 2020.

The National eye health framework aims to provide a blueprint for nationally coordinated action by governments, health professionals, non-government organisations, industry and individuals to work in partnership to reduce the incidence of avoidable vision loss in Australia. It does not focus on any one specific eye condition, but rather seeks to address the underlying issues common to the prevention and treatment of eye disease and vision loss in general. The Framework sets out strategies in the following key areas for action:

  • reducing the risk of eye disease and injury
  • increasing early detection
  • improving access to care
  • improving the quality and systems of care
  • improving the evidence base.

The Framework document is accompanied by a background paper entitled Eye health in Australia which provides background information about eye disease in Australia, including the prevalence of eye disease and injury, current treatment options and the economic and social impact of blindness and vision loss. It also provides an overview of the international and national policy context, information about the Australian eye health workforce, major eye health programs and services and related public health strategies.

Department of Health and Ageing abstract

2004

Taylor V, Ewald D, Liddle H, Warchivker I (2004)

Review of the implementation of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health program.

Canberra: Centre for Remote Health

The intention of the review was to determine the current state of the implementation of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health Program (NATSIEHP). The report includes the program background and a summary of progress since previous recommendations were made. Other details include: the main eye conditions affecting Indigenous people; data collections; service delivery (including specialist services); and the availability and utilisation of equipment. Further recommendations suggest options for integrating the NATSIEHP into the primary health sector.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

2001

Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (2001)

Specialist eye health guidelines for use in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

Canberra: Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care

The Specialist eye health guidelines for use in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations cover three eye health conditions common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians:

  • cataract
  • diabetic retinopathy
  • trachoma.

They are based on a review of existing literature and practice, and provide information about the treatment and management of these conditions in rural and remote communities.

Although primarily for use by ophthalmologists, the guidelines are a reference for all eye health professionals working in primary health care settings, including:

  • optometrists
  • orthoptists
  • National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye health program coordinators
  • Aboriginal Health Workers and other allied health professionals.

Abstract adapted from the Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Department of Health and Ageing

 
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