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This section provides recent references compiled from our bibliographic database about communicable diseases relating to Indigenous environmental health. This information is of particular relevance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander environmental health practitioners. References include journal articles, reports, theses and other literature. To access our complete database please use our bibliography.

2015

Gear RJ, Carter JC, Carapetis JR, Baird R, Davis JS (2015)

Changes in the clinical and epidemiological features of group A streptococcal bacteraemia in Australia's Northern Territory.

Tropical Medicine & International Health; 20(1): 40–47

2014

Asher AJ, Holt DC, Andrews RM, Power ML (2014)

Distribution of Giardia duodenalis assemblages A and B among children living in a remote Indigenous community of the Northern Territory, Australia.

PLoS One; 9(11): e112058

Chang AB, Brown N, Toombs M, Marsh RL, Redding GJ (2014)

Lung disease in Indigenous children.

Paediatric Respiratory Reviews; 15(4): 325–332

Clarke MF, Rasiah K, Copland J, Watson M, Koehler AP, Dowling K, Marshall HS (2014)

The pertussis epidemic: informing strategies for prevention of severe disease.

Epidemiology and Infection; 141(3): 463-471

Crowe AL, Smith P, Ward L, Currie BJ, Baird R (2014)

Decreasing prevalence of Trichuris trichiura (whipworm) in the Northern Territory from 2002 to 2012.

Medical Journal of Australia; 200(5): 286-289

Currie B, Bowen A, Tong S, Andrews M, O’Meara I, McDonald M, Chatfield M, Carapetis J (2014)

Short-course oral co-trimoxazole versus intramuscular benzathine benzylpenicillin for impetigo in a highly endemic region: an open-label, randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial.

The Lancet; Early Online(http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60841-2):

Currie B (2014)

Melioidosis: the 2014 revised RDH guideline.

Northern Territory Disease Control Bulletin; 21(2): 4-8

Durr S, Ward MP (2014)

Roaming behaviour and home range estimation of domestic dogs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in northern Australia using four different methods.

Preventive Veterinary Medicine; 117(2): 340–357

Edwards J, Moffat CD (2014)

Otitis Media in remote communities.

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Journal; 21(9): 28

Einsiedel LJ, Pepperill C, Wilson K (2014)

Crusted scabies: a clinical marker of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection in central Australia [letter].

Medical Journal of Australia; 200(11): 633-634

Engelman D, Hofer A, Davis JS, Carapetis JR, Baird RW, Giffard PM, Holt DC, Tong StYC (2014)

Invasive staphylococcus aureus Infections in children in tropical Northern Australia.

Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society; 3(4): 304-311

Hare KM (2014)

The bacteriology of bronchiectasis and impact of azithromycin on upper and lower airway bacteria and resistance in Australian Indigenous children.

Doctor of Philosophy thesis, Charles Darwin University: Darwin

Hotez PJ (2014)

Aboriginal populations and their neglected tropical diseases.

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 8(1): e2286

Retrieved 30 January 2014 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002286

Jervis-Bardy J, Sanchez L, Carney AS (2014)

Otitis media in Indigenous Australian children: review of epidemiology and risk factors.

The Journal of Laryngology & Otology; 128(Supplement S1): S16-S27

Kearns TM, Andrews R, Speare R, Cheng R, McCarthy J, Carapetis J, Currie B, Page W, Shield J (2014)

Prevalence of scabies and strongyloidiasis before and after MDA in a remote Aboriginal community in Northern Territory, Australia.

International Journal of Infectious Diseases; 21(Supplement 1): 252

Lange FD, Baunach E, McKenzie R, Taylor HR (2014)

Trachoma elimination in remote Indigenous Northern Territory communities: baseline health-promotion study.

Australian Journal of Primary Health; 20(1): 34-40

LangstaffR, Kopczynski A, Alvoen F, Marika W, Ganambarr R, Maymuru B, Wald L, Jenkins J, GalliersJ, Saroukos C, Thompson S, Foster T, Bray M, Gunasekara D, Vick S, Prince S (2014)

One Disease: tackling scabies and crusted scabies across the Top End.

Northern Territory Disease Control Bulletin; 21(2): 18-19

Liu X, Walton S, Mounsey K (2014)

Vaccine against scabies: necessity and possibility.

Parasitology; 141(6): 725-732

Lokuge B, Kopczynski A, Woltmann A, Alvoen F, Connors C, Guyula T, Mulholland E, Cran S, Foster T, Lokuge K, Burke T, Prince S (2014)

Crusted scabies in remote Australia, a new way forward: lessons and outcomes from the East Arnhem Scabies Control Program.

Medical Journal of Australia; 200(11): 644-648

Lowbridge C (2014)

Informing the control of communicable diseases.

Doctor of Philosophy thesis, University of NSW: Sydney

Marquardt T (2014)

Managing skin infections in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Australian Family Physician; 43(1/2): 16-19

This article provides an overview of some of the issues to consider when managing a patient with a skin infection, which may impact on completion of treatment and development of complications in the long term.

The article recommends management consisting of treatment of the patient through medication and also general measures for the patient, their family and the community as a whole.

Content covered includes:

  • common causes of skin infections
  • bacterial infections
  • viral infections
  • fungal infections
  • parasitic infections
  • management of infections
  • recurrence/persistence
  • non-compliance
  • treatment failure/incorrect diagnosis
  • re-infection
  • isolation/risk of spread
  • general interventions
    • patient specific
    • community based.

The article also provides a case study of a child with scabies and a secondary bacterial component.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

McCaw JM, Glass K, Mercer GN, McVernon J (2014)

Pandemic controllability: a concept to guide a proportionate and flexible operational response to future influenza pandemics.

Journal of Public Health; 36(1): 5-12

Miller A, Smith ML, Judd JA, Speare R (2014)

Strongyloides stercoralis: systematic review of barriers to controlling strongyloidiasis for Australian Indigenous communities.

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 8(9): e3141

Retrieved 25 September 2014 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003141

Quinn E, Massey P, Rosewell A, Smith M, Durrheim D (2014)

Improving ethnocultural data to inform public health responses to communicable diseases in Australia.

Western Pacific Surveillance and Response; 5(2):

Rac K, McLaughlin M (2014)

Melioidosis in the Torres Strait Islands: an 11 year audit 2001-2012.

Australian Medical Student Journal; 4(2): 62-65

Reynolds SL, Pike RN, Mika A, Blom AM, Hofmann A, Wijeyewickrema LC, Kemp D, Fischer K (2014)

Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 8(5): 1-8

Schrieber L, Towers R, Muscatello G, Speare R (2014)

Transmission of streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis between child and dog in an Aboriginal Australian community.

Zoonoses and Public Health; 61(2): 145–148

Selvey LA, Johansen CA, Broom AK, Antão C, Lindsay MD, Mackenzie JS, Smith DW (2014)

Rainfall and sentinel chicken seroconversions predict human cases of Murray Valley encephalitis in the north of Western Australia.

BMC Infectious Diseases; 14: 672

Retrieved 10 December 2014 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-014-0672-3

Spurling GKP, Askew DA, Schluter PJ, Simpson F, Hayman N (2014)

Household number associated with middle ear disease at an urban Indigenous health service: a cross-sectional study.

Australian Journal of Primary Health; 20(3): 285-290

Swe PM, Fischer K (2014)

A scabies mite serpin interferes with complement-mediated neutrophil functions and promotes staphylococcal growth.

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 8(6): e2928

Retrieved 19 June 2014 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002928

Tong SY, Varrone L, Chatfield MD, Beaman M, Giffard PM (2014)

Progressive increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Indigenous populations in northern Australia from 1993 to 2012.

Epidemiology and Infection; FirstView(http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268814002611):

Williamson DA, Coombs GW, Nimmo GR (2014)

Staphylococcus aureus “down under’: contemporary epidemiology of staphylococcus aureus in Australia, New Zealand and the south west Pacific.

Clinical Microbiology and Infection; 20(7): 597–604

2013

Askew DA, Schluter PJ, Spurling GKP, Bond CJR, Brown ADH (2013)

Urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children's exposure to stressful events: a cross-sectional study.

Medical Journal of Australia; 199(1): 42-45

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet (2013)

Overview of the health of Indigenous people in Western Australia 2013.

Retrieved 2013 from http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/uploads/docs/wa-overview-2013.pdf

This report provides comprehensive information specific to Western Australia (WA) on:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations
  • the context of Indigenous health
  • various measures of population health status
  • selected health conditions
  • health risk and protective factors.

This WA Overview draws on statistics and other published and unpublished materials to provide up-to-date, detailed information about the health of Indigenous people in WA in 2013. It highlights a number of improvements in certain aspects of Indigenous health, but underlines that ongoing work is needed to 'close the gap' in health status between Indigenous and other Australians.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Bareja C, Enhanced Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Surveillance Working Group (2013)

Enhanced Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Surveillance Working Group – quarterly surveillance report.

Communicable Diseases Intelligence; 37(2): E175-E178

Communicable Diseases Intelligence (2013)

National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System tables.

Communicable Diseases Intelligence; 37(2): E180-E186

Cowling CS, Liu BC, Ward JS, Snelling TL, Kaldor JM, Wilson DP (2013)

Australian Trachoma Surveillance annual report, 2011.

Communicable Diseases Intelligence; 37(2): E121-E129

Davis JS, McGloughlin S, Tong SY, Walton SF, Currie BJ (2013)

A novel clinical grading scale to guide the management of crusted scabies.

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 7(9): e2387

Retrieved 12 September 2013 from http://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0002387

Gough N, Oates S, Grillet S, Pholeros P (2013)

Infectious disease management for Aboriginal children of Far West NSW.

NSW Public Health Bulletin; 24(2): 95

Gunaratnem PJ, Gilmour RE, Lowbridge C, McIntyre PB (2013)

Invasive pneumococcal disease.

New South Wales Public Health Bulletin; 24(3): 142-147

Holt DC, Burgess STG, Reynolds S, Wajahat M, Fischer K (2013)

Intestinal proteases of free living and parasitic astigmatid mites.

Cell and Tissue Research; 351(2): 339-352

Holt DC, Fischer K (2013)

Novel approaches to an old disease: recent developments in scabies mite biology.

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases; 26(2): 110-115

Johnson B, Gunn J (2013)

A is for antibiotics: mass drug administration as a strategy to control trachoma in remote Indigenous communities.

Northern Territory Disease Control Bulletin; 20(4): 23-28

Kearns T (2013)

Scabies and strongyloidiasis prevalence before and after a mass drug administration in a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory.

Doctor of Philosophy thesis, Charles Darwin University: Darwin

Kline K, McCarthy JS, Pearson M, Loukas A, Hotez PJ (2013)

Neglected Tropical Diseases of Oceania: review of their prevalence, distribution, and opportunities for control.

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 7(1): e1755

Retrieved 31 January 2013 from http://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0001755

Knope K, Whelan P, Smith D, Nicholson J, Moran R, Doggett S, Sly A, Hobby M, Kurucz N, Wright P (2013)

Arboviral diseases and malaria in Australia, 2010-11: annual report of the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee.

Communicable Diseases Intelligence; 37(1): E1-E20

Lahra MM, Enriquez R (2013)

Meningococcal surveillance Australia reporting period 1 January to 31 March 2013.

Communicable Diseases Intelligence; 37(2): E179

Lai JYR, Cook H, Yip T, Berthelsen J, Gourley S, Krause V, Smith H, Leach AJ, Smith-Vaughan H (2013)

Surveillance of pneumococcal serotype 1 carriage during an outbreak of serotype 1 invasive pneumococcal disease in central Australia 2010–2012.

BMC Infectious Diseases; 13: 409

Retrieved 3 September 2013 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-13-409

Lu W, Wise MJ, Tay CY, Windsor HM, Marshall BJ, Peacock C, Perkins T (2013)

Comparative analysis of the full genome of the helicobacter pylori isolate, sahul64, identifies genes of high divergence.

Journal of Bacteriology; 196(10):

Morse LP, Smith J, Mehta J, Ward L, Cheng AC, Currie BJ (2013)

Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis from infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei: a 20-year prospective melioidosis study from northern Australia.

Journal of Orthopaedics; 10(2): 86-91

National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System Annual Report Writing Group (2013)

Australia’s notifiable disease status, 2011: annual report of the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System.

Canberra: National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

New South Wales Ministry of Health (2013)

Year in review: health protection in NSW, 2012.

New South Wales Public Health Bulletin; 24(3): 105-118

Ross KE, O'Donahoo FJ, Garrard TA, Taylor MJ (2013)

Simple solutions to Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

BMJ; 2013: f6294

Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f6294

Schrieber L (2013)

Are dogs a source of streptococci in Aboriginal Australian communities?.

: Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities

Smith-Vaughan HC, Binks MJ, Marsh RL, Kaestli M, Ward L, Hare KM, Pizzutto SJ, Thornton RB, Morris PS, Leach AJ (2013)

Dominance of haemophilus influenzae in ear discharge from Indigenous Australian children with acute otitis media with tympanic membrane perforation.

BMC Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders; 13: 12

Retrieved 8 October 2013 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6815-13-12

Towers RJ, Carapetis JR, Currie BJ, Davies MR, Walker MJ (2013)

Extensive diversity of streptococcus pyogenes in a remote human population reflects global-scale transmission rather than localised diversification.

PLoS One; 8(9): e73851

Retrieved 16 September 2013 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073851

Williams P, Oosterhuis C, O'Neill M (2013)

A trichiasis screening program in the Kimberley 2008–2010.

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health; 37(3): 290

2012

Bailie RS, Stevens M, McDonald EL (2012)

The impact of housing improvement and socio-environmental factors on common childhood illnesses: a cohort study in Indigenous Australian communities.

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health; 66(9): 821-831

Baunach E, Lines D, Pedwel B, Lange F, Cooney R, Taylor HR (2012)

The development of culturally safe and relevant health promotion resources for effective trachoma elimination in remote Aboriginal communities.

Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal; 36(2): 9-11,16,19

Coombs GW, Goering RV, Chua KYL, Monecke S, Howden BP, Stinear TP, Ehricht R, O'Brien FG, Christiansen KJ (2012)

The molecular epidemiology of the highly virulent ST93 Australian community staphylococcus aureus strain.

PLOS One; 7(8): e43037

Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0043037

Ejere HOD, Alhassan MB, Rabiu M (2012)

Face washing promotion for preventing active trachoma.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; (4): CD003659

Retrieved 2 September 2011 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD003659.pub3

Clean faces, strong eyes influencing knowledge, attitudes and practice with health promotion and social marketing (2012)

Lange FD, Stanford E, Atkinson J, Taylor HR

This poster was created for the Victorian Department of Health, Aboriginal Health Conference, 'Aboriginal health - everyone's responsibility', and uses images and bullet points to cover the following areas:

  • explanation and prevalence of trachoma
  • social, cultural, economic and environmental factors contributing to the spread of trachoma
  • goals and strategies of trachoma elimination programs
  • role of culturally appropriate health promotion resources and social marketing
  • trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice in the Northern Territory in 2011.

Health promotion and social marketing initiatives are provided as case examples, including: the Trachoma story kits, Clean faces, strong eyes, and the Milpa, the trachoma goanna, mascot.

It offers a useful summary for Aboriginal Health Workers, health professionals and other community workers looking to change attitudes and practice at the individual and community level.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Lokuge B (2012)

The East Arnhem Scabies Control Program: a community empowerment strategy to eliminate crusted scabies and scabies as public health issues in Australia: 12 month report from March 2011 (launch) to April 2012.

Darwin: One Disease At A Time

MacLachlan JH, Lavender CJ, Cowie BC (2012)

Effect of latitude on seasonality of tuberculosis, Australia, 2002–2011.

Emerging Infectious Diseases; 18(11): 1879-1881

National Health and Medical Research Council (2012)

Staying healthy: preventing infectious diseases in early childhood education and care services (5th edition).

Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council

Staying healthy: preventing infectious diseases in early childhood education and care services provides educators and other staff working in education and care services with simple and effective methods for minimising the spread of disease.

The advice aims to reduce the risk of serious infections and infectious diseases spreading through child care centres to the children's families, the workers and the community.

The advice is presented in six parts:

  • concepts of infection control
  • monitoring illness in children
  • procedures
  • issues for employers, educators and other staff
  • fact sheets on diseases common to education and care services
  • forms, useful contacts and websites.

Please note that this guideline is best practice advice to help anyone caring for children make good decisions for children in their care, and not a new set of rules.

The advice contained within these guidelines is drawn from established guidelines that are regularly updated using the principles of evidence-based medicine.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Parameswaran U, Baird RW, Ward LM, Currie BJ (2012)

Melioidosis at Royal Darwin Hospital in the big 2009-2010 wet season: comparison with the preceding 20 year.

Medical Journal of Australia; 196(5): 345-348

Sanchez L, Carney S, Estermann A, Sparrow K, Turner D (2012)

An evaluation of the benefits of swimming pools for the hearing and ear health status of young Indigenous Australians: a whole-of-population study across multiple remote Indigenous communities.

Adelaide: School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Flinders University

This document reports on a study to investigate whether the use of swimming pools by school-age Indigenous children in remote semi-arid communities in central Australia results in the reduction and possible prevention of conductive hearing loss related to otitis media (OM) in these children.

Between 2009 - 2011, multiple clinical assessments of ear health and hearing - including Ear, nose and throat (ENT) diagnoses - were conducted on 813 school age children, which allow comparison of the results for children living in the four Anangu communities with a swimming pool compared to those living in the six communities without a pool. Many children were assessed on multiple occasions with 46% of the children being assessed on at least three of the possible six occasions over the three year study period (2107 child assessments in total).

The study's results demonstrate that access to swimming pools does not result in improvement in any of three principal measured indices of hearing or ear health. Additionally, in relation to the policy of 'no school, no pool', there is no evidence that access to a swimming pool results in improved school attendance. Further, results show previously undescribed seasonal differences in the prevalence of eardrum perforations in these Indigenous populations. Other results show significant associations between dry eardrum perforation and hearing loss and age.

This research report was funded by the Hearing Loss Prevention Program of the Department of Health and Ageing and conducted by Flinders University and its collaborating partner, the Anangu Education Service of the South Australian (SA) Department of Education and Child Development.

Abstract adapted from Flinders University

Spurling GKP, Askew DA, Schluter PJ, Simpson F, Hayman NE (2012)

Conventionally accepted risk factors do not explain higher rates of middle ear disease in remote Indigenous children: an ecological study [letter].

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health; 36(5): 491-492

Tong SYC, van Hal SJ, Einsiedel L, Currie BJ, Turnidge JD (2012)

Impact of ethnicity and socio-economic status on staphylococcus aureus bacteremia incidence and mortality: a heavy burden in Indigenous Australians.

BMC Infectious Diseases; 12: 249

Retrieved 9 October 2012 from http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2334/12/249

2011

Coppa K, Wurrulnga E, Kopczynski A (2011)

Milingimbi healthy homes & skin week.

Paper presented at the Australian Health Promotion Association 20th National Conference. 11 April 2011, Cairns, Qld

enHealth Working Group for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Health (2011)

8th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Health Conference Darwin, NT.

Canberra: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

This conference monograph was produced by the enHealth Working Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Health (WGATSIEH), and details the proceedings of the 8th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Health Conference held in Darwin at the Darwin Convention Centre, 27-30 September 2011.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Gilmore SJ (2011)

Control strategies for endemic childhood scabies.

PLoS ONE; 6(1): e15990

Retrieved 25 January 2011 from http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=EC322D086620F361C24C7F8EA8A8C38E.ambra02?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0015990&representation=PDF

Hii S-F, Kopp SR, Thompson MF, O'Leary CA, Rees RL, Traub RJ (2011)

Molecular evidence of Rickettsia felis infection in dogs from Northern Territory, Australia.

Parasites & Vectors; 4: 198

Retrieved 11 October 2011 from http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/pdf/1756-3305-4-198.pdf

Hudson S (2011)

One disease at a time: eradicating scabies in east Arnhem Land.

Policy; 27(2): 23-25

Massey PD (2011)

Controlling communicable diseases in rural New South Wales: epidemiological research for directing health policy and practice.

Doctor of Public Health thesis, James Cook University: Townsville, Qld

McDonald E, Slavin N, Bailie R, Schobben X (2011)

No germs on me: a social marketing campaign to promote hand-washing with soap in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

Global Health Promotion; 18(1): 62-65

McMeniman E, Holden L, Kearns T, Clucas DB, Carapetis JR, Currie BJ, Connors C, Andrews RM (2011)

Skin disease in the first two years of life in Aboriginal children in East Arnhem Land.

Australasian Journal of Dermatology; 52(4): 270–273

Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA (2011)

The West Australian Indigenous storybook : celebrating and sharing good news stories : the Kimberley and Pilbara edition.

Perth, WA: Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA

The West Australian Indigenous storybook (The storybook) is the first in a series of Indigenous storybooks showcasing the achievements of Indigenous communities and people across Western Australia. The stories are from the Kimberley and Pilbara regions. The stories of programs contained within The storybook cover a range of social, economic, health and environmental health achievements. The intention of each program was to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of Indigenous people.

The storybook shares both the successes and failures of the programs, and it is hoped that this will encourage a change in how Indigenous programs are planned, delivered and disseminated.

The storybook covers a range of programs including:

  • healthy lifestyle initiatives
  • community awareness programs relating to suicide and good parenting
  • local government environmental health and health projects
  • effective partnerships
  • social benefit programs.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

2010

Bailie RS, McDonald EL, Stevens M, Guthridge S, Brewster DR (2010)

Evaluation of an Australian Indigenous housing programme: community level impact on crowding, infrastructure function and hygiene.

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health; 65(5): 432-437

Centre for Appropriate Technology (2010)

National Indigenous infrastructure guide.

Alice Springs: Centre for Appropriate Technology

This publication provides a framework to facilitate an understanding of the issues which arise in the provision of infrastructure for remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The main focus of the guide is the installation and maintenance of infrastructure which is appropriate and sustainable for remote Indigenous communities. The importance of community in this process is highlighted in the guide.

The National Indigenous infrastructure guide complements the existing National Indigenous Housing Guide and the Environmental Health Handbooks. The guide provides information on:

  • existing research
  • codes and standards
  • resources
  • community infrastructure.

The guide was produced by the Centre for Appropriate Technology (CAT) with funding from the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA).

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Centre for Appropriate Technology (2010)

National Indigenous infrastructure guide: wastewater.

In: Centre for Appropriate Technology, ed. National Indigenous infrastructure guide. Alice Springs: Centre for Appropriate Technology: 33

This publication provides a framework to facilitate an understanding the issue of waste water management which arises in the provision of infrastructure for remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The main focus of the guide is the installation and maintenance of infrastructure which is appropriate and sustainable for remote Indigenous communities. The importance of community in this process is highlighted in the guide.

The National Indigenous infrastructure guide complements the existing National Indigenous Housing Guide and the Environmental Health Handbooks. The guide provides information on:

  • existing research
  • codes and standards
  • resources
  • community infrastructure.

The guide was produced by the Centre for Appropriate Technology (CAT) with funding from the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA).

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Department of Health and Families (2010)

Central Australian regional plan 2010-2012.

Darwin: Department of Health and Families, Northern Territory

The central Australia region covers 830,000 square kilometres; with a population of over 46,000 people, 44% identify as Indigenous Australians. Over 32,000 people live in Alice Springs, Tennant Creek and Yulara. The remainder of the population live in 45 remote communities and outstations. The regional plan has six action areas:

  • Promoting and protecting good health and wellbeing and preventing injury.
  • Healthy children and young people in safe and strong communities.
  • Targeting smoking, alcohol and substance abuse.
  • Connecting care.
  • Safety, quality and accountability.
  • Attract, develop and retain a workforce for the future.

Central Australia is unique in the need for flexible service delivery cross-borders, providing emergency care to more than 4,000 people living outside of the NT, including those people residing in South Australia, Queensland and Western Australia.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Environmental Health Needs Coordinating Committee (2010)

Environmental health needs of Aboriginal communities in Western Australia: the 2008 survey and its findings.

Perth: Western Australian Department of Health, Public Health Division

The Western Australian Environmental health needs survey was conducted over 2007 and 2008 and is the third survey in a series which surveyed housing, services, utilities, community infrastructure and the immediate living environment in discrete Aboriginal communities in WA. Data collected related to over 15,000 residents from 232 communities. This publication reports the outcomes of this survey and provides a comparison with the outcomes of the 1997 and 2004 surveys.

The survey was conducted by environmental health practitioners who work with and in discrete Aboriginal communities. The practitioners visited the communities to survey existing infrastructure. Information was also collected about levels of community satisfaction and any concerns with the provision of essential, municipal and allied services which influenced and affected environmental health in the communities.

The core environmental health and infrastructure issues covered in the report were:

  • water
  • electricity
  • housing
  • solid waste disposal
  • sanitation
  • dust
  • dog health programs
  • emergency management

The report provides an evidence base which highlights the continued environmental health issues faced by many of the communities who participated in the survey. It is the foundation for the future direction of service plans and delivery in discrete communities.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Holt DC, McCarthy JS, Carapetis JR (2010)

Parasitic diseases of remote Indigenous communities in Australia.

International Journal for Parasitology; 40(10): 1119–1126

Lehmann D, Alpers K (2010)

Impact of swimming pools in remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.

Public Health Bulletin SA; 7(3): 32-37

McDonald E, Bailie R (2010)

Hygiene improvement: essential to improving child health in remote Aboriginal communities.

Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health; 46(9): 491-496

Morton P, Barlow G, Bailie R (2010)

Waterborne diseases among Aboriginal people.

New South Wales Public Health Bulletin; 21(8): 183-184

Scarr J, Roberts F (2010)

Remote pools 2010: a Royal Life Saving review of swimming pools in remote areas of the Northern Territory.

Canberra: Royal Life Saving NT

2009

Andrews R, Kearns T (2009)

East Arnhem regional healthy skin project: final report 2008.

Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research and Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health

This report details the outcomes of the East Arnhem Regional Healthy Skin Project which was implemented into East Arnhem Land in September 2004 to develop community based control of skin infections in the region. The project involved screening children aged 15 years and younger for scabies, skin sores, and tinea, and also included treatment and follow up services. The results of the project are for a three year period from 2004 to 2007 and are discussed in terms of the prevalence of skin sores, scabies, and tinea over the study period.

Essentially the report highlights the success of the project in reducing skin sore prevalence and infected scabies. The project also led to the establishment of an outreach service model whereby all infants and children attending Baby Health Clinics are screened for skin infections and appropriately treated. Follow up home visits are also provided to those families with children with identified skin infections. The report concludes by remarking that plans exist to continue the project for a further 12 months to determine whether further gains can be made in reducing the prevalence of scabies, skin sores, and tinea.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Andrews RM, McCarthy J, Carapetis JR, Currie BJ (2009)

Skin disorders, including pyoderma, scabies, and tinea infections.

Pediatric Clinics of North America; 56(6): 1421-1440

Barnett R, Abreu C, Penberthy D (2009)

Mister germ hand washing hygiene and nutrition program.

Paper presented at the 7th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Health Conference Kalgoorlie, WA. 12-15 May 2009, Kalgoorlie, WA

Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health (2009)

CRC for Aboriginal Health annual report 0809.

Casuarina, NT: Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health

Healthcare Planning and Evaluation (2009)

Evaluation of the sustainability and benefits of swimming pools in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands (APY lands) in South Australia : final report – de-identified.

Canberra: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

La Vincente S, Kearns T, Connors C, Cameron S, Carapetis J, Andrews R (2009)

Community management of endemic scabies in remote Aboriginal communities of northern Australia: low treatment uptake and high ongoing acquisition.

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases; 3(5): e444

Retrieved from http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2680947

Schobben X, Clements N (2009)

‘No germs on me' hand washing campaign.

Paper presented at the 7th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Health Conference Kalgoorlie, WA. 12-15 May 2009, Kalgoorlie, WA

Standing Committee on Health and Ageing (2009)

Regional health issues jointly affecting Australia and the South Pacific.

Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia

United Nations University - Traditional Knowledge Initiative (2009)

Climate change experiences in Northern Australia - health, adaptation, fire management and global relevance.

Paper presented at the International Public Forum on Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change - The Tropical Australian Experience. 3 April 2008, Darwin

2008

Baker M, Das D, Venugopal K, Howden-Chapman P (2008)

Tuberculosis associated with household crowding in a developed country.

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health; 62(8): 715-721

Campbell D, Smith MS, Daview J, Kuipers P, Wakerman J, McGregor MJ (2008)

Responding to health impacts of climate change in the Australian desert.

Rural and Remote Health; 8: 1008

Retrieved 8 August 2008 from http://www.rrh.org.au/publishedarticles/article_print_1008.pdf

Centre for Disease Control (2008)

Guidelines for management of trachoma in the Northern Territory.

Darwin: Northern Territory Centre for Disease Control

The Guidelines for management of trachoma in the Northern Territory 2008 were adapted from the Communicable Disease Network Australia (CDNA) Guidelines for the public health management of trachoma in Australia 2006, to reflect the unique needs of the Northern Territory.

The guidelines differ from the CDNA guidelines in the following ways.

  1. Azithromycin antibiotic treatment is recommended for all cases and household contacts of trachoma including babies
  2. Children under 6 months of age who receive azithromycin should be actively followed up at 1 week and 4 weeks to observe for adverse effects
  3. In communities where the rate of trachoma is greater than 20%, re-treatment with azithromycin after 6 months is strongly encouraged.

Abstract adapted from Northern Territory Centre for Disease Control

Clements N (2008)

No germs on me - hand washing campaign.

Northern Territory Disease Control Bulletin; 15(3): 22

McDonald E, Bailie R, Brewster D, Morris P (2008)

Are hygiene and public health interventions likely to improve outcomes for Australian Aboriginal children living in remote communities? A systematic review of the literature.

BMC Public Health; 8: 153

Retrieved 8 May 2008 from http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/8/153

Nirrumbuk Aboriginal Corporation (2008)

Nillir Irbanjin (One Mile) issues and environmental health report.

Broome: Shire of Broome

 
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