Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet
http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au

 

Related publications

  • Home
    • » Protective & risk factors
      • » Volatile substance use (including petrol sniffing)
        • » Policies and strategies
          • » Related publications

2013

Haswell MR, Blignault I, Fitzpatrick S, Jackson Pulver L (2013)

The social and emotional wellbeing of Indigenous youth: reviewing and extending the evidence and examining its implications for policy and practice.

Sydney: Muru Marri, University of New South Wales

National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (2013)

Report on consultations to inform the development of the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy 2013-2018.

Canberra: National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee

National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Council (2013)

Funding of alcohol and other drug interventions and services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Canberra: National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Council

National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Council (2013)

NIDAC online consultation: a professional body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander alcohol and other drug workers.

Canberra: National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Council

New South Wales Parliament General Purpose Standing Committee No 2 (2013)

Drug and alcohol treatment.

Sydney: Parliament of New South Wales

Northern Territory volatile substance abuse prevention act (2013)

Northern Territory Government

Taylor K, Dingwall K, Lindeman M, Lopes J, Grant L (2013)

Aboriginal youth suicide in Central Australia: developing a consistent data system and referral pathway.

Darwin: Centre for Remote Health

2012

Brady M (2012)

The National Drug Strategy and Indigenous Australians: missed opportunities and future challenges [the James Rankin Oration 2011].

Drug and Alcohol Review; 31(6): 747–753

Developing an inhalant misuse community strategy: second edition (2012)

MacLean S

This publication aims to assist local communities to address inhalant misuse. The second edition contains updated advice for use by communities and community workers across Australia. The publication:

  • shows how a community strategy might be developed
  • provides case studies illustrating action taken in five localities in the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia
  • concludes with a list of useful resources and references.

This booklet is designed to support staff and people for whom English is a first language. For Indigenous community members who do not speak English as a first language, the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council has produced other resources that may be more useful.

Abstract adapted from National Inhalants Information Service

National Indigenous Alcohol and Drug Committee (2012)

NIDAC strategic plan 2012 – 2014.

Canberra: National Indigenous Alcohol and Drug Committee

2011

Australian National Audit Office (2011)

Northern Territory night patrols.

Canberra: Australian National Audit Office

Maclean SJ, D'Abbs PHN (2011)

Five challenges for volatile substance misuse policy and intervention in Australia.

Drug and Alcohol Review; 30(2): 223–227

National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (2011)

NIDAC implementation plan.

Canberra: National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee

Victorian Alcohol and Drug Association (2011)

Victorian Alcohol and Drug Association consultation into the whole of Victorian Government Alcohol and Drug Strategy.

Melbourne: Victorian Alcohol and Drug Association

Victorian Department of Health (2011)

Whole-of-government Victorian alcohol and drug strategy: community consultation.

Melbourne: Victorian Department of Health

2010

Central Australian Petrol Sniffing Strategy Unit (2010)

Approved response to the review report of the Central Australian Petrol Sniffing Strategy Unit.

Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Cultural & Indigenous Research Centre Australia (2010)

Research to inform the development of the Youth Diversion Communication Strategy in the East Kimberly and Central Desert Region: final report.

Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

This research was conducted by the Cultural and Indigenous Research Centre Australia (CIRCA) on behalf of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA). The aim of the research was to inform future communication strategies and policy designed to reduce the incidence of substance use among Aboriginal young people in the East Kimberly and Central Desert Regions. Researchers conducted stakeholder interviews in the Northern Territory (NT) and Western Australia (WA), including site visits to Docker River (NT) and Kununurra (WA) between September and October 2009.

One of the major findings of this research is that communications are not seen as a priority for addressing Volatile Substance Abuse (VSA) among Aboriginal young people. Instead of funding communications, providing significant funding and support for Youth diversion programs was identified as a way to have the greatest impact on VSA.

The research identified that the most likely way to use communications development to impact substance misuse was to work with at-risk youth to design and develop resources that target other young people. This method can effectively engage youth with key messages on harm minimisation and prevention, and educate them on the long term affects of substance use. When considering the most effective way to use message delivery for young people in the central desert and Kimberley regions, the research indicates that a fluid, dynamic and interactive communication strategy is most appropriate.

Different strategies are needed to address different population groups including: young people; key influencers: families, elders and community leaders; youth workers; retailers; and non-Indigenous residents.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Gray D, Stearne A, Wilson M, Doyle M (2010)

Indigenous-specific alcohol and other drug interventions: continuities, changes and areas of greatest need.

Canberra: Australian National Council on Drugs

Roxon N, Snowdon W, Macklin J (2010)

Australian Government tackles petrol sniffing in remote WA.

Retrieved from http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/mr-yr10-ws-ws014.htm

Senate Community Affairs References Committee (2010)

Combined Australian Government response to two Senate Community Affairs References Committee reports on petrol sniffing in Indigenous communities.

Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

The Australian Government introduced the Petrol Sniffing Strategy (PSS) in 2005. This report is the government's response to Grasping the opportunity of Opal: assessing the impact of the Petrol Sniffing Strategy (2009), and its companion 2006 report, Beyond petrol sniffing: renewing hope for Indigenous communities.

The 2006 report contained 23 recommendations: 16 were accepted by the government; six were noted; and one gave rise to further consideration. The 2009 report contained 18 recommendations: 11 were accepted by the government; 6 were noted; and one gave rise to further consideration. Recommendations from the reports included: raising awareness in communities of the availability of assistance with the supply of Opal fuel; the expansion of the areas covered by the PSS eight point plan; a communication strategy in advance of future Opal fuel rollout; improved data collection on substance abuse including petrol sniffing by Indigenous people; consistent, longer term funding for programs under the PSS; the establishment of safe houses for those at risk of harm from intoxicated sniffers; rehabilitation facilities for petrol sniffers; and legislation to mandate the supply of Opal fuel.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Shaw G (2010)

Research into legislation relating to petrol sniffing - executive summary.

Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

South Australian Centre for Economic Studies (2010)

Cost benefit analysis of legislation to mandate the supply of opal fuel in regions of Australia: final report.

Adelaide: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

The South Australian Centre for Economic Studies (SACES) was commissioned by the Department of Health and Ageing (DOHA) to investigate legislative options and to undertake a cost benefit analysis to mandate the supply of Opal fuel in regions of Australia. The SACES report follows an investigation by the Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs into the impact of the Petrol Sniffing Strategy introduced in 2005. The Committee determined that while the introduction of Opal fuel under the Petrol Sniffing Strategy had been effective in reducing petrol sniffing, in the absence of voluntary agreement on the part of all relevant stations the Australian Government should draft legislation to mandate the supply of Opal in the Petrol sniffing strategy zone.

SACES found that the Commonwealth probably has the power to legislate to establish a ban on regular unleaded petrol (RULP) in prescribed areas accompanied by the provision of subsidised Opal (without an explicit compulsion to stock Opal). The sale of premium unleaded petrol (PULP) would be controlled where necessary by a Minister should it come to be seen as a contributor to sniffing. Importantly, the scheme outlined also allows a Minister to grant exemptions to a ban or controls where appropriate. Where potential gaps in the scope of the Commonwealth legislation exist, relevant States could refer powers to the Commonwealth.

The SACES report identified three scenarios: the Central scenario based on an 80% reduction in sniffing; the High impact scenario based on an erosion of voluntary Opal supply; and the Diversion scenario based on inhalant substitution. SACES found that under all three scenarios the benefits of mandating the supply of Opal outweighed the costs. Further, in the Analysis Area excluding Darwin (Darwin is not considered to have a petrol sniffing problem) the surplus of benefits over costs are greater. While regional variation in the benefits over costs exists in the Central scenario, all regions return benefits over costs.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

2009

National Drug Strategy (2009)

Australia's National Drug Strategy beyond 2009: consultation paper.

Canberra: National Drug Strategy

Siggins Miller (2009)

Evaluation and monitoring of the National Drug Strategy 2004-2009.

Canberra: National Drug Strategy

Standing Committee on Community Affairs (2009)

Grasping the opportunity of Opal: assessing the impact of the Petrol Sniffing Strategy.

Canberra: Senate Community Affairs Committee, Parliament of Australia

On 19 March, Senator Claire Moore tabled this report by the Australian Parliament's Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs of its inquiry into the impact of the Petrol Sniffing Strategy.

The report contains 18 recommendations, addressing the following matters:

  • the ongoing effectiveness of the eight-point plan in combating petrol sniffing in central Australia
  • the extent of the roll out of Opal fuel
  • the delivery of youth services in the affected areas
  • the effectiveness and adequacy of resources provided to address petrol sniffing and substance use in central Australia
  • what more needs to be done to effectively address petrol sniffing.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Urbis (2009)

Evaluation of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Complementary Action Plan 2003-2009 (CAP): final report.

Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing, Australia

Urbis (2009)

Evaluation of the National Drug Strategy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Complementary Action Plan 2003 - 2009: final report.

Canberra: National Drug Strategy

Urbis (2009)

Evaluation of the National Drug Strategy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Complementary Action Plan 2003-2009: background paper.

Canberra: Drug Strategy Branch, Department of Health and Ageing, Australia

URBIS (2009)

Review of the Central Australian Petrol Sniffing Strategy Unit.

Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

2008

d’Abbs P, McLean S, Brady M (2008)

From platitudes to policies: the evolving response to volatile substance misuse in Australia.

In: Moore D, Dieteze P, eds. Drugs and public health. Australian perspectives on policy and practice.. Melbourne: Oxford University Press: 39-48

d’Abbs P, Shaw G (2008)

Executive summary of the “Evaluation of the impact of Opal fuel”.

Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing, Australia

Joudo J (2008)

Responding to substance abuse and offending in Indigenous communities: review of diversion programs.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology

This report examines diversion programs currently available to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous offenders in Australia. This report is the first stage of a larger study evaluating the way that Australian Governments have sought to address Indigenous substance use and related offending. The report provides an overview of the type and extent of current diversion programs available and highlights the related issues and barriers to effective participation and completion for Indigenous offenders. The research for this report included literature research and consultations in all States and Territories. Findings suggest that is is necessary to consider the drug use problems specific to Indigenous offenders, and that programs should be expanded to include substances such as alcohol and inhalants.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

MacLean S (2008)

Developing an inhalant misuse community strategy.

Woden, ACT: National Inhalants Information Service

Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy (2008)

Intergovernmental Committee on Drugs National Drug Strategic Framework annual report 2006–07 to the Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy.

Canberra: Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy

Schwartzkoff J, Wilczynski A, Reed-Gilbert K, Jones L (2008)

Review of the first phase of the petrol sniffing strategy.

Canberra: Urbis

The Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) released the 'Review of first phase of the petrol sniffing strategy' prepared by Urbis. The Petrol Sniffing Strategy (PSS) involves an eight point plan that includes both supply reduction and demand reduction strategies which aims to:

  • reduce both incidence and impact of petrol sniffing in a defined area of Central Australia by addressing the social determinants of health and wellbeing
  • evaluate the effectiveness of a regional and comprehensive response to petrol sniffing to establish the utility of expanding the strategy to other regions.

Overall, stakeholders regard the eight point plan of the PSS as a realistic effort to address the petrol sniffing problem. The Opal fuel has succeeded in substantially reducing the level of petrol sniffing, though more needs to be done in relation to strengthening and supporting communities, and engaging young people. It is believed that improved consultation and sharing of information is needed, and that maintaining a focus on petrol sniffing is important until such time as it is sufficiently reduced, and then issues around sniffing can be seen in the broader context of alcohol and other drugs problems and their associated policy responses.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

2007

Australian Department of Health and Ageing (2007)

Mid term evaluation of the Indigenous National Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce Development Program.

Canberra: Senate Select Committee on Regional and Remote Indigenous Communities

Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy (2007)

Intergovernmental Committee on Drugs National Drug Strategic Framework annual report 2005–06 to the Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy.

Canberra: Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy

Ritter A (2007)

Priority areas in illicit drug policy: perspectives of policy makers.

Sydney: Drug Policy Modelling Program

2006

Access Economics (2006)

Opal cost benefit analysis.

Canberra: The Opal Alliance

Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy (2006)

Intergovernmental Committee on Drugs National Drug Strategic Framework annual report 2004–05 to the Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy.

Canberra: Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy

National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (2006)

Community report - Brisbane, Qld.

Canberra: National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee

National Inhalant Abuse Taskforce (2006)

National directions on inhalant abuse: final report.

Melbourne: Victorian Department of Human Services

Taskforce on Butane Misuse (2006)

Western Australian Taskforce on Butane Misuse: report and recommendations.

Perth: Western Australia Drug and Alcohol Office

2003

Alcohol and other Drugs Council of Australia (2003)

Policy positions of the Alcohol and other Drugs Council of Australia.

Retrieved from http://www.adca.org.au/content/view/24/66/

 
© 2001-2014 Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet