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Key references

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References for the key publications about alcohol use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are listed here.

2014

National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (2014)

Alcohol and other drug treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Canberra: National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee

2013

Australian Bureau of Statistics (2013)

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey: first results, Australia, 2012-13.

Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics

This summary of the first findings from the 2012-13 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey provides information on long-term health conditions, health risk factors, selected social and emotional wellbeing indicators, health measurements, and health related actions for Indigenous Australian peoples. Information is included on Indigenous peoples living in remote and non-remote areas.

Abstract adapted from Australian Bureau of Statistics

2012

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2012)

Alcohol and other drug treatment services National Minimum Data Set 2012–13: specifications and collection manual.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

The Alcohol and other drug treatment services National Minimum Data Set 2012-13: specifications and collection manual is a reference for those collecting and supplying data for the Alcohol and other drug treatment services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS-NMDS), including Australian Government and state and territory government staff, and AOD treatment agency staff. Major changes to the 2012-13 edition include:

  • an update to the 'Principal drug of concern' data item to align with the Australian Standard Classification of Drugs of Concern (2011)
  • the inclusion of additional data elements to enable the number of clients receiving treatment to be estimated.

Abstract adapted from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Brady M (2012)

The grog book: strengthening Indigenous community action on alcohol (revised edition).

Revised ed. Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing

This book was developed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who want to tackle the effects that grog has on their communities. The book has eight chapters on: history; alcohol; action; prevention; controls; strategies; care and handouts. For each chapter there is:

  • a list of contents
  • a key word (chapter title) tab
  • a colour coded tab
  • colourful pictures that relate to the topic
  • colour coded arrows which allow the user to find other topics within the book which deal with the same issue
  • a list of resources that might be helpful to learn more about an issue

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs (2012)

FASD: the hidden harm: Inquiry into the prevention, diagnosis and management of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

Canberra: Parliament of Australia

2011

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011)

2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey report.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

The 2010 National Drug Strategy Household Survey was conducted between late-April and early-September 2010. This was the 10th survey in a series which began in 1985, and was the fifth to be managed by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). More than 26,000 people aged 12 years or older participated in the survey, in which they were asked about their knowledge of and attitudes towards drugs, their drug consumption histories, and related behaviours. Most of the analysis presented is of people aged 14 years or older, so that results can be compared with previous reports.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare abstract

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011)

Substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Hudson S (2011)

Alcohol restrictions in Indigenous communities and frontier towns.

St Leonards, NSW: Centre for Independent Studies

Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy (2011)

National drug strategy 2010-2015.

Canberra: Australian Government

The National drug strategy 2010-2015 is a framework for action on alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.

The aim of the National drug strategy 2010-2015 is to build safe and healthy communities by minimising alcohol, tobacco and other drug-related health, social and economic harms among individuals, families and communities.

The National drug strategy 2010-2015 is divided into three parts:

  • Part 1 provides background and explains the conceptual framework of the strategy
  • Part 2 details specific objectives and suggested actions under each pillar
  • Part 3 discusses the supporting approaches of workforce, evidence, performance monitoring and governance.

Abstract adapted from the National drug strategy

2010

Wilson M, Stearne A, Gray D, Saggers S (2010)

Review of the harmful use of alcohol amongst Indigenous Australians.

Perth, WA: Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

2009

Australian Department of Health and Ageing (2009)

Drug and alcohol service reporting 2007–08 key results: a national profile of Australian Government funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use specific services.

Canberra: Australian Department of Health and Ageing

The information contained in this report is comprised of data obtained from Australian Government funded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander substance use specific service providers. The data, collected over a 12 month period, relates to client and staffing profiles, location and funding of services, and service delivery. Information is also provided on these specific areas for the previous five years allowing for comparisons.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

National Health and Medical Research Council (2009)

Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol.

Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council

In 2009, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) introduced revised guidelines that depart from specifying 'risky' and 'high risk' levels of drinking. The guidelines seek to estimate the overall risk of alcohol-related harm over a lifetime and to reduce the level of risk to one death for every 100 people.

There is no longer any difference in the guidelines based on gender; the guidelines are universal for adults over 18 years (Guidelines 1 and 2). Specific guidance is also provided for children and young people (Guideline 3), and pregnant and breastfeeding women (Guideline 4).

  • Guideline one: to reduce the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury, no more than two standard drinks should be consumed on any day
  • Guideline two: to reduce the risk of injury on a single occasion of drinking, no more than four standard drinks should be consumed
  • Guideline three: recommends that children under 15 years are at the greatest risk of harm from drinking and that for this age group, not drinking alcohol is especially important. For young people aged 15-17 years, the safest option is to delay the initiation of drinking for as long as possible
  • Guideline four: recommends for women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or planning to become pregnant, not drinking is the safest option.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

 
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