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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Publications

2014

Meuleners LB, Fraser ML, Ng J, Morlet N (2014)

The impact of first- and second-eye cataract surgery on injurious falls that require hospitalisation: a whole-population study.

Age and Ageing; 43(3): 341-346

Randall DA, Reinten T, Maher L, Lujic S, Stewart J, Keay L, Leyland AH, Jorm LR (2014)

Disparities in cataract surgery between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in New South Wales, Australia.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 42(7): 629–636

Van Zyl L, Kahawita S, Goggin M (2014)

Manual small incision extracapsular cataract surgery in Australia.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 42(8): 729–733

2013

Boudville AI, Anjou MD, Taylor HR (2013)

Indigenous access to cataract surgery: an assessment of the barriers and solutions within the Australian health system.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 41(2): 148–154

Hsueh YS, Brando A, Dunt D, Anjou MD, Boudville A, Taylor H (2013)

Cost of close the gap for vision of Indigenous Australians: on estimating the extra resources required.

Australian Journal of Rural Health; 21(6): 329-335

Hsueh YS, Dunt D, Anjou MD, Boudville A, Taylor H (2013)

Close the gap for vision: the key is to invest on coordination.

Australian Journal of Rural Health; 21(6): 299-305

Landers J, Henderson T, Craig JE (2013)

Incidence of visual impairment due to cataract, diabetic retinopathy and trachoma in Indigenous Australians within Central Australia: the Central Australian Ocular Health Study.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 41(1): 50–55

MacRae A, Thomson N, Anomie, Burns J, Catto M, Gray C, Levitan L, McLoughlin N, Potter C, Ride K, Stumpers S, Trzesinski A, Urquhart B (2013)

Overview of Australian Indigenous health status, 2012.

Perth, WA: Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

This report provides recent information on:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations
  • the context of Indigenous health
  • various measures of population health status
  • selected health conditions
  • health risk and protective factors.

This Overview draws on statistics and other published and unpublished materials to provide up-to-date, detailed information about the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in 2012. It highlights a number of improvements in certain aspects of Indigenous health, but underlines that ongoing work is needed to 'close the gap' in health status between Indigenous and other Australians.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Vos T, Taylor HR (2013)

Contribution of vision loss to the Indigenous health gap.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 41(3): 309–310

2012

Kelaher M, Ferdinand A, Taylor H (2012)

Access to eye health services among Indigenous Australians: an area level analysis.

BMC Ophthalmology; 12: 51

Retrieved 24 September 2012 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2415-12-51

Landers J, Henderson T, Craig JE (2012)

Incidence of visual impairment and blindness in Indigenous Australians within Central Australia: the Central Australian Ocular Health Study.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 40(7): 657–661

Maher L, Brown AM, Torvaldsen S, Dawson AJ, Patterson JA, Lawrence G (2012)

Eye health services for Aboriginal people in the western region of NSW, 2010.

New South Wales Public Health Bulletin; 23(4): 81-86

New South Wales Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence (2012)

The health of Aboriginal people of NSW: report of the Chief Health Officer 2012.

Sydney: New South Wales Ministry of Health

Sharma NS, Li MZ, Ooi JL (2012)

Dislocated crystalline lens in an Aboriginal patient.

Australian Journal of Rural Health; 20(2): 97-98

2011

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011)

Eye health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This paper summarises the findings of the 2008 National Indigenous eye health survey and presents data from the National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit, Medicare, hospital data collections and case studies.

The major findings include:

  • Indigenous people over the age of 40 have six times the rate of blindness of non-Indigenous Australians
  • Indigenous children have less poor vision than non-Indigenous children
  • 94% of vision loss in Indigenous Australians is preventable or treatable
  • 35% of Indigenous Australians report they have never had an eye examination
  • trachoma was found in one half of very remote communities at endemic levels
  • cataract was the cause of one-third of blindness in Indigenous adults.

Research suggests that improved vision is associated with provision of eye services by the community-controlled sector and that well coordinated services are more productive, have shorter waiting lists and save money.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Taylor HR, Boudville A, Anjou M, McNeil R (2011)

The roadmap to close the gap for vision: summary report.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, the University of Melbourne

This report is the third part in a series produced by the Indigenous Eye Health Unit at the University of Melbourne, following from the National Indigenous eye health survey report and Access to eye health services among Indigenous Australians. The report makes important recommendations for policy change in eye and vision health across all levels of government in Australia. Each policy recommendation is explained, all possible outcomes are explored, and costings presented clearly. There is also a 'recommendation implementation map' with a timeline for actioning of each recommendation.

Importantly, the report dispels some common myths about Indigenous eye and vision health: poor vision and blindness are the third leading cause of the health gap among Indigenous populations (after cardiovascular disease and diabetes) and increase mortality rates 2.6 times, much of it due to increased risk of injury. Indigenous Australian adults have blindness rates six times the rate of the mainstream; and, although 94% of vision loss is preventable and treatable, 35% of all adults have never had an eye exam. This report represents an important contribution to policy debates.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Taylor HR, Dunt D, Hsueh Y, Brando A (2011)

Projected needs for eye care services for Indigenous Australians.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, the University of Melbourne

2010

Hattersley K, Laurie KJ, Liebelt JE, Gecz J, Durkin SR, Craig JE, Burdon KP (2010)

A novel syndrome of paediatric cataract, dysmorphism, ectodermal features, and developmental delay in Australian Aboriginal family maps to 1p35.3-p36.32.

BMC Medical Genetics; 11: 165

Retrieved 19 November 2010 from http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2350-11-165.pdf

Kelaher M, Ferdinand A, Ngo S, Tambuwla N, Taylor HR (2010)

Access to eye health services among Indigenous Australians: an area level analysis.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population Health

Landers J, Henderson T, Craig J (2010)

Prevalence and associations of cataract in Indigenous Australians within central Australia: the Central Australian Ocular Health Study.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 38(4): 387-392

Taylor HR, Stanford E (2010)

Provision of Indigenous eye health services.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population Health

Taylor HR, Xie J, Arnold AL, Goujon N, Dunn RA, Fox S, Keeffe J (2010)

Cataract in Indigenous Australians: the National Indigenous Eye Health Survey.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 38(8): 790–795

2009

Taylor HR, National Indigenous Eye Health Survey Team (2009)

National Indigenous eye health survey: minum barreng (tracking eyes): full report.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit, The University of Melbourne

This report details the findings of the National Indigenous Eye Health Survey which was conducted in 2008 to define:

  • the extent of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • the causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • the impact of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

The survey was designed to plan and prioritise the effective delivery of eye care for Indigenous people. Overall 2,883 Indigenous people were examined. The report records the extent of eye health problems such as refractive error, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, blindness and trachoma.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Turner A, Mulholland W, Taylor HR (2009)

Outreach eye services in Australia.

Melbourne: Indigenous Eye Health Unit

Wright HR, Keeffe JE, Taylor HR (2009)

Trachoma, cataracts and uncorrected refractive error are still important contributors to visual morbidity in two remote Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory, Australia.

Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; 37(6): 550-557

2008

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2008)

Eye health in Australia: a hospital perspective.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Saliba AJ (2008)

Impact of rurality on optical health: review of the literature and relevant Australian Bureau of Statistics data.

Rural and Remote Health; 8: 1056

Retrieved 10 December 2008 from http://www.rrh.org.au/publishedarticles/article_print_1056.pdf

Van Minnen K, Spilsbury K, Ng J, Morlet N, Xia J, Semmens J (2008)

Changing patterns of access to cataract surgery: a population study spanning 22 years.

Health & Place; 15(1): 394-398

 
Last updated: 1 December 2014
 
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