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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Safe Aboriginal Youth (SAY) program

 

Overview

The Safe Aboriginal Youth (SAY) program aims to identify Aboriginal young people in New South Wales (NSW) who are unsupervised on the street at night. SAY patrols provide safe transport options to clients and link them to a safe place where they can access supervised activities and trained youth workers, who will link them with services relevant to their individual needs.

SAY patrols aim to reduce the risk of young people engaging in crime, and they also reduce the likelihood of victimisation by removing young people from situations where they might be at risk.

Many of the clients who access SAY patrols do not generally access mainstream services during the day, as they are frequently on the street late at night when those services are not available. SAY patrols help to overcome that by making clients aware of services that are available to them and by actively assisting clients to access those services.

The Department of Attorney General and Justice (DAGJ) places strong emphasis on engaging professional organisations with significant cultural and youth engagement expertise to implement the SAY program.

SAY patrols currently operate in Armidale, Bourke, Dareton, Dubbo, Kempsey, La Perouse, Newcastle, Nowra, Taree, and Wilcannia.

Abstract adapted from the NSW Government

Contacts

Please refer to the links below for the contact details for the Safe Aboriginal Youth program.

Links

 
Last updated: 18 October 2016
 
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