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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Airway bacteriology of children with bronchiectasis

 

Overview

This study conducted by the Menzies School of Health Research is investigating the bacteria found in the lungs and airways of children suffering from bronchiectasis and the effectiveness of antibiotics to treat this condition. The results of this study will assist in determining the aetiology (causes) of bronchiectasis and the future management of children with this illness.

Abstract adapted from Menzies School of Health Research

Contacts

Kim Hare
Menzies School of Health Research
Email: kim.hare@menzies.edu.au

Related publications

Hare KM, Binks MJ, Grimwood K, Chang AB, Leach AJ, Smith-Vaughan H (2012)

Culture and PCR detection of haemophilus influenzae and haemophilus haemolyticus in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

Journal of Clinical Microbiology; Published ahead of print(http://jcm.asm.org/content/early/2012/04/26/JCM.00566-12.abstract):

Hare KM, Leach AJ, Morris PS, Smith-Vaughan H, Torzillo P, Bauert P, Cheng AC, McDonald MI, Brown N, Chang AB, Grimwood K (2012)

Impact of recent antibiotics on nasopharyngeal carriage and lower airway infection in Indigenous Australian children with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents; 40(4): 365–369

Hare KM, Marsh RL, Binks MJ, Grimwood K, Pizzutto SJ, Leach AJ, Chang AB, Smith-Vaughan HC (2013)

Quantitative PCR confirms culture as the gold standard for detection of lower airway infection by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

Journal of Microbiological Methods; 92(3): 270–272

This study observed correlation between quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semi-quantitative culture for definition of Haemophilus influenzae infection in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from 81 Indigenous children with bronchiectasis. Data collected supported the continued use of quantitative culture as the gold standard.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Hare KM, Grimwood K, Leach AJ, Smith-Vaughan H, Torzillo PJ, Morris PS, Chang AB (2010)

Respiratory bacterial pathogens in the nasopharynx and lower airways of Australian Indigenous children with bronchiectasis.

The Journal of Pediatrics; 157(6): 1001-1005

Hare KM, Smith-Vaughan HC, Leach AJ (2012)

The bacteriology of lower respiratory infections in Papua New Guinean and Australian Indigenous children.

Papua New Guinea Medical Journal; 53(3/4): 151-165

Links

 
Last updated: 26 February 2014
 
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