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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Aboriginal youth sexual health and didgeridoo project

 

Overview

The Aboriginal youth sexual health didgeridoo project was developed out of recognition for the need to educate Aboriginal young people in Goulburn about the impact of unsafe sexual practices and the effects of alcohol and other drug use.

To ensure maximum engagement of the young people in the program, the development phase of the program involved extensive consultations with Aboriginal community members and a wide range of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal community organisations. The outcome of this consultation process was a 12 week program which used meaningful activities, grounded in culture, to inform Aboriginal young people about sexual health and alcohol and other drugs.

The program was based at a community youth centre and sessions ran for two hours, once a week. The project included information sessions conducted by guest presenters. These sessions sought to:

In addition to the information sessions, Aboriginal music, art, story telling, and didgeridoo making was also incorporated into the program.

Feedback from the participants in the program evaluation suggested the program was successful. The participants reported being very satisfied with the program content and delivery. The sustained engagement of the participants and the pride they took in the work they produced were further indicators of the success of the program.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Contacts

Donna Lennon
Communications and Publications Coordinator
Development Unit
Greater Southern Area Health Service
Ph: (02) 6933 9184
Email: donna.lennon@gsahs.health.nsw.gov.au

Links

 
Last updated: 25 August 2014
 
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