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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Tomorrow people

 

Overview

Tomorrow people is part of the Australian Better Health Initiative's Measure Up campaign, which is a joint Australian, State and Territory government health initiative.

Tomorrow people is about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people being healthier and living longer - today, tomorrow and in the future.

The website explains how improvements can be made to improve overall health, by making a few simple changes to eating habits and by being more active in daily life.

The catchphrase is: Tomorrow people starts today. Do it for our kids - do it for our culture.

Abstract adapted from Tomorrow People

Contacts

Department of Health
National Office
Sirius Building
Furzer Street
Woden Town Centre ACT
GPO Box 9848
Canberra ACT 2601
Ph: 1800 020 103 or (02) 6289 1555
Email: enquiries@health.gov.au

Related publications

Tomorrow people (2008)

Australian Better Health Initiative

This resource package is part of the Australian better health initiative's Measure up campaign, a joint federal, state and territory health initiative. Tomorrow people focuses on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can be healthier and live longer. The website has information about how people can improve their health by making a few simple changes to eating habits, and by being more active in daily life. This information includes:

There are posters and radio interviews with well-known Indigenous sports people and media personalities, and a booklet, that promote the messages on the website.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Links

 
Last updated: 16 April 2015
 
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