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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Strong women, strong babies, strong culture

 

Overview

The Strong women, strong babies, strong culture program promotes improvement in the health of Aboriginal women and their babies.
The program aims to:

The program recognises the traditional cultural approaches to parenting and lifestyle, supporting pregnant Aboriginal women and their babies through better diet, education and ante natal care, with the aim of increasing the birth weight of babies and improving early childhood development. The program relies on and supports senior women in participating communities to provide direct support to pregnant women and their families. The senior women encourage attendance at antenatal care clinics and provide advice on nutrition. Connections and support for involvement in cultural events are an important part of the program. This particular program is one that has a strong community development focus and potentially major health benefits to Aboriginal people. This has a long term outlook with lasting benefits rather than only treating immediate health problems.

Contacts

Marlene Liddle
Ph: (08) 8922 7766

Evaluated publications

Newsletter: Menzies School of Health Research (1998)

Evaluation of the pilot phase of the strong women, strong babies, strong culture program.

Newsletter: Menzies School of Health Research; (22): 1

Mackerras D (1998)

Evaluation of the strong women, strong babies, strong culture program : results for the period 1990-1996 in the three pilot communities.

Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research

d'Espaignet E, Measey M, Carnegie MA, Mackerras D (2003)

Monitoring the 'Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture Program': the first eight years.

Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health; 39(9): 668-672

Links

 
Last updated: 4 July 2013
 
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