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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Aboriginal male health and well-being consultation project

 

Overview

The Aboriginal male health and well-being project aimed to improve services for Aboriginal men in the metropolitan area of Adelaide in South Australia (SA).

This project was a joint initiative of Nunkuwarrin Yunti of SA Inc (NY) and the Aboriginal Sobriety Group Incorporated (ASG) with funding from the Health for life program. 

A joint steering group was formed to engage and advise a consultant to undertake specific engagement with Aboriginal males with the aim of identifying ways for services to meet their needs in promoting and delivering effective services for Aboriginal men.

Community consultations were carried out where participants were asked a series of questions to gain a better understanding of what men needed for their health and well-being and what they wanted from their health services.

Workshops were carried out with fifty staff members from both organisations, participants were asked a series of questions with the aim of informing the project about what Aboriginal men needed from their services.

The responses from the community and staff consultation workshops have resulted in a range of outcomes, these are presented in the Aboriginal male health and well-being project report.

Abstract adapted from Aboriginal male health and well-being consultation project report

Contacts

Nunkuwarrin Yunti (NY)
Hutt Street
PO Box 7202
Adelaide SA 5000
Ph: (08) 8406 1600
Fax: (08) 8232 0949

Aboriginal Sobriety Group Incorporated (ASG)
182 - 190 Wakefield Street
Adelaide SA 5000
Ph: (08) 8223 4204
Fax: (08) 8232 6685
Email: reception@asg.org.au

Links

 
Last updated: 16 July 2014
 
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