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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Promoting Water Consumption in Remote Communities

 

Overview

This program initiated by the Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA (PHAIWA) and Diabetes WA aims to promote healthier beverage choices in two remote Aboriginal communities in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. The project was developed in response to the high rates of dental caries, type 2 diabetes and overweight and obesity, much of which is related to high sugar consumption, particularly in the form of sugar sweetened beverages.

Project strategies include:

Abstract adapted from Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA

Contacts

Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA
Faculty of Health Sciences
GPO Box U1987
Perth WA 6845
Ph: (08) 9266 1544
Fax: (08) 9266 9244
Email: phaiwa@curtin.edu.au

Related publications

Diabetes WA (2014)

Soft drink consumption in Aboriginal communities [infographic].

Perth, WA: Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia

This infographic was produced as part of the Soft drink consumption in Aboriginal communities project, which aimed to investigate the extent of soft drink consumption problems among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Western Australia, and to identify additional policy solutions.

This infographic presents key facts on soft drink consumption in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and additionally provides some information on potable water.

The infographic was produced by Diabetes WA, the Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA), and the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA).

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Links

 
Last updated: 29 November 2016
 
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