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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Bridge programme

 

Overview

The Bridge programme is for the treatment of persons with alcohol, other drugs, and/or other dependencies. It uses a combination of individual, group and/or family counselling, spiritual awareness, life skills training, and staff role modelling to encourage the client to make significant life changing decisions.The programme takes a harm minimisation approach, while recognising that for some clients, the programme is directed towards total abstinence.

The Salvation Army operates many services under this programme from the Northern Territory, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia.

Programme contact details for each state and territory are provided in the information link below.

Abstract adapted from the Salvation Army

Contacts

The Salvation Army
95-99 Railway Road
PO Box 479
Blackburn Vic 3130
Ph: (03) 8878 4500
Fax: (03) 8878 4840
Email: salvosaus@aus.salvationarmy.org

Related publications

Salvation Army (2006)

Binge drinking and alcohol abuse: the facts.

Canberra: The Salvation Army Crisis Service

This Salvation Army publication describes alcohol use and binge drinking - including the physical and mental health harms - and provides tips for reducing alcohol use.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Salvation Army (2004)

Dangers of drugs.

Canberra: Salvation Army

This Salvation Army publication describes six drugs (alcohol, marijuana, ecstasy, cocaine, heroin, and speed); providing information on what each drug is, and the short term and long term effects including physical and mental harms. Information on where to access help is provided at the back of the document.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Links

 
Last updated: 14 April 2014
 
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