Skip to content

Key resources

  • Bibliography
    Bibliography
  • Health promotion
    Health promotion
  • Health practice
    Health practice
  • Yarning places
    Yarning places
  • Programs
    Programs
  • Organisations
    Organisations
  • Conferences
    Conferences
  • Courses
    Courses
  • Funding
    Funding
  • Jobs
    Jobs
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 
  • Home
    • » Key resources and services
      • » Programs and projects
        • » Reducing impulsivity in repeat-violent offenders using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

Reducing impulsivity in repeat-violent offenders using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

 

Overview

This project seeks to provide evidence for the hypothesis that regulating serotonin metabolism will reduce impulsivity and thus lead to improved offending outcomes.

Using a randomised control trial of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) versus placebo in a sample of community-based offenders, the project will aim to establish if SSRIs are beneficial in reducing impulsive, violent behaviour.

The project is based on the rationale that serotonergic dysfunction in the brain is linked to impulsive behaviour, and impulsivity is linked to offending behaviour, including violent offending. SSRIs are a class of antidepressants that aim to regulate serotonin metabolism in the brain. It is hypothesised that regulating serotonin metabolism will reduce impulsivity and lead to improved offending outcomes.

Abstract adapted from The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity

Contacts

Tony Butler
Professor and Program Head
Justice health research program
The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity
University of New South Wales
Corner Boundary and West Streets
Darlinghurst NSW 2010
Ph: (02) 9289 2928
Email: tbutler@kirby.unsw.edu.au

Links

 
Last updated: 8 April 2014
 
Return to top