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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 
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        • » Reducing Australia's Aboriginal prisoner population using justice reinvestment – assessing the public's views to incarceration versus non-incarceration alternatives using a citizens' jury approach

Reducing Australia's Aboriginal prisoner population using justice reinvestment – assessing the public's views to incarceration versus non-incarceration alternatives using a citizens' jury approach

 

Overview

This project seeks to inform debate surrounding justice reinvestment by investigating through 'citizens' juries', the opinions and views of a critically informed public toward treatment alternatives to incarceration. The research project will also investigate whether policy makers are influenced by the opinions and views of the 'citizens' juries'.

Prisoner populations endure some of the worst health outcomes in the community in terms of mental illness, chronic disease, excess mortality and exposure to communicable diseases; use of injecting drugs, alcohol, and tobacco is also very common. Justice reinvestment has been proposed as a possible solution to Indigenous over-representation in Australia's criminal justice system where funds intended to be spent on criminal justice matters are diverted back into local communities to fund services in areas such as; mental health, drug and alcohol, employment, and housing to address the underlying causes of crime.

A team of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers will provide important evidence in the offender health area and contribute to addressing Indigenous over-representation in the Australian criminal justice system.

Abstract adapted from the Lowitja Institute

Contacts

Tony Butler
Professor
The Kirby Institute
University of New South Wales
Corner Boundary and West Streets
Darlinghurst NSW 2010
Ph: (02) 9385 9257
Email: tbutler@kirby.unsw.edu.au

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Last updated: 1 May 2013
 
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