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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Eat well be active South Australia

 

Overview

The eat well be active community programs (EWBA) in South Australia (SA) aimed to increase healthy eating and physical activity behaviours in young people from birth to 18 years. The aim was to also address both environmental and individual barriers to healthy eating and physical activity.

The key target audience were Aboriginal mothers and their new born babies. A multi-strategy community development approach was adopted in two communities, Morphett Vale (metropolitan) and Murray Bridge (rural).

The program coordinators worked in partnership with a variety of sectors in these two communities such as:

A comprehensive evaluation was conducted which included a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods. These community programs were part of the Eat well be active SA Strategy 2011-2016.

Contacts

Health Promotion Branch
Department of Health
Level 4
11 Hindmarsh Square
Adelaide SA 5000
Ph: (08) 8226 6329
Fax: (08) 8226 6133

Related publications

Wilson A, Jones M, Kelly J, Magarey A (2012)

Community-based obesity prevention initiatives in aboriginal communities: the experience of the Eat Well Be Active community programs in South Australia.

Health; 4(12A): 1500-1508

Evaluated publications

Magarey AM, Pettman TL, Wilson A, Mastersson N (2013)

Changes in primary school children's behaviour, knowledge, attitudes, and environments related to nutrition and physical activity.

ISRN Obesity; 2013: 752081

Retrieved 17 February 2013 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/752081

Pettman T, Magarey A, Matersson N, Dollman J, Wilson A (2014)

Improving weight status in childhood: results from the eat well be active community programs.

International Journal of Public Health; 59(1): 43-50

Links

 
Last updated: 25 February 2014
 
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