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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Overcrowding for Indigenous households in non-remote areas

 

Overview

The Overcrowding for Indigenous households in non-remote areas research project aimed to develop a model of Australian Indigenous house crowding in order to provide policy-makers with ways to predict, measure and manage Aboriginal household overcrowding.

The project was conducted in two stages:

The researchers found that cultural factors such as Indigenous peoples' kin ties and mobility patterns were significant in increasing stresses of overcrowding. So too were broader societal and economic factors such as scarcity of housing in Indigenous communities. The researchers also found that householders used a range of strategies to cope with stress. The most important of these included:

A key implication of the study is that crowding cannot be identified through density measures alone, and that models of crowding should take into account both density and stress.

Abstract adapted from the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute

Contacts

Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute
Level 1, 114 Flinders Street
Melbourne Vic 3000
Ph: (03) 9660 2300
Fax: (03) 9663 5488
Email: information@ahuri.edu.au

Evaluated publications

Memmott P, Birdsall-Jones C, Greenop K (2012)

Australian Indigenous house crowding.

Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute

Links

 
Last updated: 23 January 2013
 
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