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Research into the effects of stigma and nihilistic views on lung cancer outcomes



This research investigated the impact of stigma and nihilistic (destructiveness to self or others; or the view that medical treatments are of no value) views from the perspective of health professionals and people affected by lung cancer, including people from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. Cancer Council Queensland, as part of the Lung cancer Australia study (Cancer Australia), undertook a literature review and qualitative and quantitative research to gain an understanding of the impact of stigma and nihilistic views. The results of this research will be used to inform the content of public health messages, clinical practice and supportive care guidelines for health professionals.


Cancer Australia
Level 14
300 Elizabeth Street
Surry Hills NSW 2010
Locked bag 3
Strawbery Hills NSW 2012
Ph: (02) 9357 9400
Freecall: 1800 624 973
Fax: (02) 9357 9477

Council Cancer Queensland
553 Gregory Terrace
Fortitude Valley Qld 4006
PO Box 201
Spring Hill Qld 4004
Ph: (07) 3634 5100
Fax: (07) 3257 1306

Related publications

Chambers SK, Dunn J, Occhipinti S, Hughes S, Baade P, Sinclair S, Aitken J, Youl P, O’Connell DL (2012)

A systematic review of the impact of stigma and nihilism on lung cancer outcomes.

BMC Cancer; 12: 184

Retrieved 20 May 2012 from

This study systematically reviewed the evidence on the influence of stigma and nihilism on lung cancer patterns of care. It looked at patients' psychosocial and quality of life outcomes, and how this may link to public health programs.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Cancer Australia (2012)

The impact of stigma on people diagnosed with lung cancer.

: Cancer Australia

This audiovisual discusses the stigma that is faced by people diagnosed with lung cancer. Emerging evidence shows that lung cancer patients, more so than those with other cancers, may feel stigmatised by their disease. The main message is to encourage people to understand that all people diagnosed with cancer, regardless of what type, need support and understanding to survive their disease.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract


Last updated: 20 March 2014
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