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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Aboriginal patterns of cancer care project

 

Overview

The Patterns of cancer care for Aboriginal people (APOCC) project is being run by Cancer Council NSW to investigate the reason for the increasing number of deaths from cancer in Aboriginal people in NSW. The focus areas include:

There are five stages to the project:

Abstract adapted from Cancer Council NSW

Contacts

Cancer Council NSW
APOCC Project
Ph: 1800 247 209
Email: apocc@nswcc.org.au

Related publications

Newman C, Treloar C, Brener L, Ellard J, O'Connell D, Butow P, Supramaniam R, Dillon A (2008)

Aboriginal patterns of cancer care: a five-year study in New South Wales.

Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal; 32(3): 6-7

Supramaniam R (2012)

Closing the information gap: using APOCC Data to inform change.

Paper presented at the Living longer stronger: AH&MRC chronic disease conference 2012. 2012, Sydney

Treloar C, Gray R, Brener L, Jackson C, Saunders V, Johnson P, Harris M, Butow P, Newma C (2013)

Health literacy in relation to cancer: addressing the silence about and absence of cancer discussion among Aboriginal people, communities and health services.

Health & Social Care in the Community; 21(6): 655–664

This study examined individual, social and cultural aspects of health literacy relevant to cancer among Indigenous patients, carers and their health workers in New South Wales. It aimed to inform communication and help highlight how beliefs can shape responses to cancer.

The data was collected from interviews conducted with 22 Indigenous people who had been diagnosed with cancer, 18 people who were carers of Indigenous people with cancer and 16 healthcare workers (eight Aboriginal and eight non-Aboriginal health workers).

The results showed that awareness, knowledge and experience of cancer were largely absent from people's lives and experiences until they were diagnosed, and that Indigenous views on cancer (particularly equating cancer to death) differed from mainstream non - Indigenous views.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Newman CE, Gray R, Brener L, Jackson LC, Johnson P, Saunders V, Harris M, Butow P, Treloar C (2013)

One size fits all? The discursive framing of cultural difference in health professional accounts of providing cancer care to Aboriginal people.

Ethnicity & Health; 18(4): 433-447

This paper identifies recurrent patterns of 'discursive framing' in interviews with health care professionals. It highlighted the reliance of familiar narratives about cancer care services that may not be culturally suited to Indigenous people affected by cancer.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Links

 
Last updated: 26 March 2014
 
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