Skip to content

Key resources

  • Bibliography
    Bibliography
  • Health promotion
    Health promotion
  • Health practice
    Health practice
  • Yarning places
    Yarning places
  • Programs
    Programs
  • Organisations
    Organisations
  • Conferences
    Conferences
  • Courses
    Courses
  • Funding
    Funding
  • Jobs
    Jobs
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 
  • Home
    • » Key resources and services

Australian integrated mental health initiative - NT (AIMHi-NT)

 

Overview

An action research project undertaken by the Menzies School of Health Research. The project involves mental health professionals and the Indigenous people living in remote areas in the Northern Territory (NT) who are suffering from a mental illness. The project incorporates a number of smaller projects to raise awareness and understanding of the factors affecting the mental health of Indigenous Australians in remote areas of the NT and the strategies required to prevent future relapses.

In partnership with Aboriginal mental health workers, this project has produced a number of multimedia resources. The National Health and Medical Research Council, Alcohol Education Rehabilitation Foundation, Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services and the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health (now the Lowitja Institute) have all provided funding for the project. Other projects running include:

Contacts

Tricia Nagel
Project Manager
Ph: (08) 8922 7944
Email: tricia.nagel@menzies.edu.au

Related publications

Nagel T, Thompson C (2006)

Aboriginal mental health workers and the improving Indigenous mental health service delivery model in the 'Top End'.

Australasian Psychiatry; 14(3): 291-294

Nagel T, Thompson C (2007)

AIMHI NT 'mental health story teller mob': developing stories in mental health.

Australian e-Journal for the Advancement of Mental Health; 6(2): 119-124

Nagel T, Thompson C, Mills R (2005)

AIMHI NT mental health story teller mob.

Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research

Nagel T (2004)

Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative (AIMHI NT) 2003 baseline measures: discussion paper 1.

Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research

Nagel T (2004)

Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative (AIMHI NT): Mental health and primary care in the Top End: discussion paper 2.

Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research

Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative (AIMHI) resources (2006)

Menzies School of Health Research

This resource package includes culturally appropriate information on mental health and mental illness for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. A range of mental health promotion resources make up this resource package, including:

This resource package was produced by the Australian integrated mental health initiative (AIMHI). This initiative was a five year project which looked at mental health in remote communities to find new ways to deliver services.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Nagel T (2006)

Australian integrated mental health initiative (AIMhi): Northern Territory.

Darwin: Menzies School of Health Research

Nagel T (2006)

Mental health stay strong care plan package: AIMHI NT.

Darwin: Auseinet

Nagel T (2008)

Relapse prevention in remote Indigenous mental health.

Doctor of Philosophy thesis, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University: Darwin

This study was designed to provide important new information about relapse prevention in Indigenous* people with chronic mental illness. A key cause of the burden of disease of mental illness is the high frequency of relapse of common mental disorders. National and international best practice guidelines recommend a range of biological and psychological strategies to prevent recurrence of mental illness. There is good evidence that many of these relapse prevention strategies improve outcomes, but there has been a paucity of clinical research into Indigenous-specific interventions.

The study was conducted in two remote Indigenous communities in the Top End of the Northern Territory (NT). It targeted Indigenous clients, carers, and Aboriginal Mental Health Workers (AMHWs) and sought to answer two questions as follows: 'can a culturally appropriate brief intervention be developed which incorporates local Indigenous perspectives of mental health and mental illness?' and 'does the brief intervention improve client mental health outcomes compared with treatment as usual'?

Assessment, psychoeducation, and care-planning resources were developed with local AMHWs in the two communities. These were gathered into a focused brief intervention. The study then implemented a randomised trial of the intervention compared with 'treatment as usual'. Clients were randomised to an 'early treatment' group, which received the intervention at baseline, and a 'late treatment' group, which received the intervention six months later. Client outcomes were assessed six monthly for eighteen months.

Participants showed significant reductions in emotional distress and substance use and significant improvements in self-management. The results confirm that promotion of self-management through psychoeducation and goal-setting is an effective relapse prevention strategy. The study contributes important new information about cross-cultural perspectives of mental health, and provides a strategy to deliver treatment in the remote setting that is brief and effective.

* For the purpose of this thesis 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and acknowledges their rich diversity of culture.

Abstract reproduced with kind permission of the author.

Nagel T (2005)

Remote mental health: Indigenous women of the Top End.

O & G Magazine; 7(4): 23-25

Nagel T (2008)

Self management: key ingredients for life style change.

The Chronicle; 11(3): 5-7

Auseinet (2005)

The Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative, Northern Territory.

Auseinetter; (23): 25

Nagel T (2006)

The need for relapse prevention strategies in Top End remote Indigenous mental health.

Australian e-Journal for the Advancement of Mental Health; 5(1): 48-52

Nagel TM, Thompson C, Robinson G, Condon J, Trauer T (2009)

Two-way approaches to Indigenous mental health literacy.

Australian Journal of Primary Health; 15(1): 50-55

Evaluated publications

Nagel T (2008)

Relapse prevention in remote Indigenous mental health.

Doctor of Philosophy thesis, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University: Darwin

This study was designed to provide important new information about relapse prevention in Indigenous* people with chronic mental illness. A key cause of the burden of disease of mental illness is the high frequency of relapse of common mental disorders. National and international best practice guidelines recommend a range of biological and psychological strategies to prevent recurrence of mental illness. There is good evidence that many of these relapse prevention strategies improve outcomes, but there has been a paucity of clinical research into Indigenous-specific interventions.

The study was conducted in two remote Indigenous communities in the Top End of the Northern Territory (NT). It targeted Indigenous clients, carers, and Aboriginal Mental Health Workers (AMHWs) and sought to answer two questions as follows: 'can a culturally appropriate brief intervention be developed which incorporates local Indigenous perspectives of mental health and mental illness?' and 'does the brief intervention improve client mental health outcomes compared with treatment as usual'?

Assessment, psychoeducation, and care-planning resources were developed with local AMHWs in the two communities. These were gathered into a focused brief intervention. The study then implemented a randomised trial of the intervention compared with 'treatment as usual'. Clients were randomised to an 'early treatment' group, which received the intervention at baseline, and a 'late treatment' group, which received the intervention six months later. Client outcomes were assessed six monthly for eighteen months.

Participants showed significant reductions in emotional distress and substance use and significant improvements in self-management. The results confirm that promotion of self-management through psychoeducation and goal-setting is an effective relapse prevention strategy. The study contributes important new information about cross-cultural perspectives of mental health, and provides a strategy to deliver treatment in the remote setting that is brief and effective.

* For the purpose of this thesis 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and acknowledges their rich diversity of culture.

Abstract reproduced with kind permission of the author.

Links

 
Last updated: 10 October 2013
 
Return to top