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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Larrakia calendar

by Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Gulumoerrgin (Larrakia) Traditional Owners

Electronic source
Year 2013
Publisher Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Last update 21 August 2013
Source url Click here to view source url

Abstract

The Larrakia calendar was produced by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) as part of the Capturing Indigenous knowledge in northern Australia project.

The calendar was developed by members of the Gulumoerrgin language group (the language for Darwin and the surrounding regions of Cox Peninsula and Gunn Point) in the Northern Territory (NT) and the CSIRO.

The Gulumoerrgin seasonal year is divided into seven main seasons:

  • balnba (rainy season)
  • dalay (monsoon season)
  • mayilema (speargrass, magpie goose egg and knock 'em down season)
  • damibila (barramundi and bush fruit time)
  • dinidjanggama (heavy dew time)
  • gurrulwa (big wind time)
  • dalirrgang (build up).

The Capturing Indigenous knowledge in northern Australia project was developed to capture Indigenous ecological knowledge to further understanding about the ecology of northern Australia, and the calendars demonstrate the wealth of knowledge that Indigenous people hold for their environment.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

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Related program(s)

  • Capturing Indigenous knowledge in northern Australia

    The Capturing Indigenous knowledge in northern Australia project was a collaboration between the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and a number of Indigenous language groups in the north of Australia to create seasonal calendars.

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  • No conference(s) found.

 
Last updated: 7 October 2014
 
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