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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin
 

Guide

Table of contents

Introduction

About the Healthy, Deadly and Strong, Healthy Lifestyle Worker Resource Pack Guide

The Healthy, Deadly and Strong, Healthy Lifestyle Worker Resource Pack Guide (the Guide) provides information about the Healthy, Deadly and Strong, Healthy Lifestyle Worker Resource Pack (the Resource Pack).

The Resource Pack contains a selection of health promotion resources that have been produced by a range of organisations. These can be used in your work as a Healthy Lifestyle Worker. The resources include books, flipcharts, DVDs, posters, brochures, and more.

The resources have been approved by people who have knowledge of chronic disease in Indigenous populations.

How to use the Healthy, deadly and strong, Healthy Lifestyle Worker resource pack guide

This Guide contains information on every resource in the Resource Pack. The resources are grouped together in sections according to their topics, for example nutrition or diabetes. Some resources contain information relating to more than one topic and will therefore be included in more than one section.

The information about the resources will include:

The resource topics will be shown using a symbol on the page. If a resource relates to more than one topic there will be more than one symbol highlighted. The symbols are:

How to use the resources in the Healthy, Deadly and Strong Healthy Lifestyle Worker Resource Pack

These resources may be used in a number of different ways.

You can:

Nutrition

Food for health: dietary guidelines for children and adolescents (2003)

Food for health: dietary guidelines for children and adolescents

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure is designed to be an easy reference outlining the basic dietary guidelines for children and adolescents in Australia. It contains the key messages from the 2003 Dietary guidelines for children and adolescents in Australia incorporating the infant feeding guidelines for health workers report, and also includes the Australian guide to healthy eating (a guide for daily food choices), recommended numbers of serves and descriptions of serving sizes.

Producer:

National Health and Medical Research Council, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Freecall: 1800 020 103

View website:

National Health and Medical Research Council
http://www.nhmrc.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This easy to read resource could be provided to parents to help them understand the needs of their children. The resource could also be provided to adolescents to help them develop their own good eating habits.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Food for health: dietary guidelines for Australian adults (2003)

Food for health: dietary guidelines for Australian adults

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure discusses the groups of foods and lifestyle patterns that promote good nutrition and health.

It contains the key messages from the 2003 Dietary guidelines for Australian adults report, and also includes the Australian guide to healthy eating (a guide for daily food choices), recommended numbers of serves, and descriptions of serving sizes.

Producer:

National Health and Medical Research Council, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Freecall: 1800 020 103

View website:

National Health and Medical Research Council
http://www.nhmrc.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This brochure is designed to be a easy reference for consumers. It can provide useful background information for someone learning about this topic. It can also be used by consumers who want to learn more about how to be healthy.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Food for health: dietary guidelines for Australians (2005)

Food for health: dietary guidelines for Australians

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This booklet disusses the groups of foods and lifestyle patterns that are recommended by experts to promote good nutrition and health. It includes information on each stage of a person's life when dietary needs are different. Each section starts with a statement about what individuals should do to promote good nutrition and health and then includes helpful tips and the dietary guidelines to achieve this. The booklet is clearly set out with diagrams, photos and tables so that the information can be easily understood.

Producer:

National Health and Medical Research Council, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Freecall: 1800 020 103

View website:

National Health and Medical Research Council
http://www.nhmrc.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The guidelines are relevant in the promotion of healthy eating and leading a physically active lifestyle. The booklet can provide useful background information for someone learning about this topic. It can also be used by people in the community who want to learn more about how to be healthy.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Food for health (2003)

Food for health

Type:

Poster

Description:

This colourful poster provides an easy to read summary of the dietary guidelines for children, adolescents and adults under the following headings:

Producer:

National Health and Medical Research Council, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Freecall: 1800 020 103

View website:

National Health and Medical Research Council
http://www.nhmrc.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This poster could be displayed in a community area or at a community event. It highlights the main dietary guidelines messages and can be used to raise people's awareness of the guidelines.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Breastfeeding: good for baby, good for mum (2008)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources from Queensland Health. It provides information on the benefits of breastfeeding for Indigenous mothers. It is easy to read with simple and colourful illustrations. Topics covered include:

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource would be useful for health staff when they talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about breastfeeding. It provides valuable information for women who have an infant and those who are pregnant or who are planning to become pregnant.

Start at the beginning - children are our future - breastfeed (no date)

Start at the beginning - children are our future - breastfeed

Type:

Poster

Description:

The poster shows an Indigenous woman breastfeeding her baby with the caption underneath - 'Start at the beginning - children are our future - breastfeed'. This is a strong image which conveys how important breast feeding is, in a simple and clear way

Producer:

SA Health, Centre for Health Promotion, Adelaide

To order copies of this resource

SA Health Centre for Health Promotion
Ph: (08) 8161 7777

View website:

Centre for Health Promotion
http://www.chdf.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is aimed at pregnant women however it would be also suited to women who are thinking of becoming pregnant. The poster could be displayed in a community centre or at a workshop. It could be used to highlight a discussion about breastfeeding or sessions about child health.

Healthy foods for children aged 1 - 4 years (2009)

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition for mothers, babies and young children.

It aims to provide parents, families and friends with suggestions on providing children with healthy foods and eating habits. It includes information on:

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource would be useful for health staff when they talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition for young children. It provides valuable information for women who have a young child and other family members or friends who are involved in the care of that child.

Healthy drinks for children aged 1 - 4 years (2009)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition for mothers, babies and young children.

This brochure talks about what drinks are good for children (water and milk) and what drinks are not good (including sugary drinks, tea and coffee). It also includes information on how to look after your child's teeth.

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource would be useful for health staff when they talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition for young children. It provides valuable information for women who have a young child and other family members or friends who are involved in the care of that child.

Overweight children (2009)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This colourful and clearly presented brochure focuses on overweight children and the ways parents and carers can help to manage and/or prevent this health problem. It covers topics including:

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition for babies and growing children to prevent weight and obesity health problems.

Kukumbat gudwan daga: really cooking good food (2009)

Kukumbat gudwan daga: really cooking good food

Type:

Book

Description:

Kukumbat gudwan daga: really cooking good food is a cookbook of up to 100 healthy recipes for feeding ten or more people. The recipes are diverse, including traditional recipes such as kangaroo tail stew and introduced favourites such as spaghetti. Created by women from the women's centres of Manyallaluk, Gulin Gulin and Wugularr in conjunction with a chef and a nutritionist from the Fred Hollows Foundation, the cookbook uses local ingredients and provides step by step photographs. The recipes all give ingredients for cooking meals for 10 people, 30 people, 50 people or 100 people, meaning the user does not need to calculate ingredient amounts as is usually the case with regular cookbooks.

Producer:

Women's centres of Manyallaluk Gulin Gulin and Wugularr, Fred Hollows Foundation, Batchelor Press, Batchelor, NT

To order copies of this resource

Batchelor Press
Ph: (08) 8939 7352
Online store: http://batchelorpress.com/books/kukumbat-gudwan-daga

View website:

Fred Hollows Foundation
http://www.hollows.org.au

When to use this resource:

The special feature of this cookbook, giving ingredient requirements for 10 people, 30 people, 50 people or 100 people, simplifies the process of cooking for large numbers. The cookbook can be used by health workers who wish to demonstrate to groups, both large and small. It can also be used by anyone who is regularly challenged by trying to create healthy meals for large groups.

Deadly tucker (2009)

Type:

Book

Description:

This cookbook is a selection of recipes that were created as part of the FOODcents for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in WA program. The Deadly Tucker cookbook is printed in colour with step-by-step photographs for each recipe, including ingredients and equipment needed. Recipes include a selection of soups, main dishes, salads, vegetables and desserts. All recipes have a rating for suitability for people with diabetes.

Producer:

Department of Health, Western Australia

To order copies of this resource

Government of Western Australia North Metropolitan Public Health Unit
Ph: (08) 9380 7758
Online order form: http://www.healthyfuture.health.wa.gov.au/Health_topics/ASTI-FOOD/ASTI_FC-order.pdf

View website:

Department of Health, Western Australia
http://www.health.wa.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The cookbook is a handy resource for doing cooking demonstrations, as well as for individuals to take home and try the recipes for themselves. The simplicity of the design and of the recipes make it a good resource for people at all levels of cooking ability.

Tucker talk tips: healthy eating and physical activity tip sheets (2010)

Type:

Factsheets

Description:

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), peak body for the community controlled sector in that state, and the Victorian Government, have collaboratively developed a series of 12 culturally appropriate physical activity and healthy eating factsheets, on the following topics:

Producer:

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Go for your life, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

VACCHO
Ph: (03) 9419 3350
Fax: (03) 9417 3871
Email: enquiries@vaccho.com.au

View website:

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
http://www.vaccho.org.au/

When to use this resource:

The resource is intended for people in the Victorian Indigenous community and designed to be distributed by Aboriginal Health Workers, other health professionals and Indigenous organisations. The fact sheets can be used to generate discussions on healthy eating and exercise with clients, in private consultation or in group settings.

Feel good: eat healthy tucker & move more everyday (2010)

Feel good: eat healthy tucker & move more everyday

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

The Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AHMRC) and the Australian Diabetes Council (ADC) in consultation with the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in NSW have developed a DVD called Feel good: eat healthy tucker and move more everyday. The DVD provides tips for Aboriginal communities on eating healthier and finding ways to move more everyday. It showcases healthy lifestyle programs that are currently running at two Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services - Tharawal Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) in Campbelltown and Galambila Aboriginal Health Service (AHS) in Coffs Harbour.

The first segment 'Feel good with healthy tucker' was filmed with participants of the community kitchen program at Tharawal AMS with celebrity chef Mark Olive. The second segment 'Move more everyday' was filmed with Australian futsal player Lachlan Wright and participants of the Spring into shape program at Galambila AHS.

Highlighting the participants' practical tips on eating healthier and how to become more active everyday on the DVD are positive steps towards achieving healthier lifestyles and preventing Type II diabetes for Aboriginal communities.

Each package includes:

Producer:

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales, Diabetes Australia - New South Wales, Sydney, NSW

To order copies of this resource

AH&MRC
Ph: (02) 9212 4777
Fax: (02) 9212 7211
Email: ahmrc@ahmrc.org.au

To order a free copy of the DVD resource please contact the AHMRC Chronic Disease Program Coordinator Amina Currimbhoy
Email: acurrimbhoy@ahmrc.org.au

View website:

Diabetes Australia
http://www.australiandiabetescouncil.com

When to use this resource:

This DVD can be used to support new or existing healthy lifestyle group activities or can be shown in individual settings to increase awareness of the benefits of a healthy diet and physical activity and how it relates to the prevention and /or management of diabetes. It is a practical and valuable educational tool for all individuals, families and those who are at risk of developing diabetes.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guide to healthy eating: educator's resource (2005)

Type:

Manual

Description:

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guide to healthy eating is a scientifically based nutrition education resource that can help educate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about choosing a balanced and varied healthy diet.

This educator's resource is a tool to provide information about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guide to healthy eating such as the amounts and kind of food that people need to eat each day to be healthy.

The booklet shows how much food is required from each food group on a daily basis for good nutrition and health. It explains how healthy eating throughout life can help reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and obesity. The foods in the booklet are readily available at stores, and also include some local bushfood and seafood.

Producer:

Northern Territory Government, Department of Health and Community Services, Darwin

To order copies of this resource

Nutrition and Physical Activity Program, NT
Ph: (08) 8985 8021

View website:

Northern Territory Government, Department of Health and Community Services
http://www.health.nt.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The educator's resource booklet has been designed to assist health professionals educate others about eating for good health. It can be used to provide background information to Health Workers and other health professionals about healthy eating; the five food groups, with examples of some of the foods that belong in these food groups, and a suggestion of how much each food group should contribute to a healthy diet. It can used for individual, family or group activities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guide to healthy eating (2005)

Type:

Poster

Description:

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guide to healthy eating poster has been adapted from the Australian guide to healthy eating. It shows, in pictures, the five food groups and the recommended proportions of each food group that should be eaten every day for good health. This version of the guide includes examples of some traditional Indigenous foods, such as kangaroo meat and damper.

Producer:

Northern Territory Government, Department of Health and Community Services, Darwin

To order copies of this resource

This resource is available in hardcopy only for people working in the Northern Territory.

To order copies of this resource:
Nutrition and Physical Activity Program Northern Territory Government Department of Health
Ph: (08) 8999 2400

If you are not from the NT you can download copies of the resource from
http://digitallibrary.health.nt.gov.au/dspace/bitstream/10137/438/2/ATSIGTHE%20poster%2009%20A3.pdf

View website:

Northern Territory Government, Department of Health and Community Services
http://www.health.nt.gov.au/

When to use this resource:

This poster can be used to raise people's awareness of the five food groups and the Australian dietary guidelines. It could be displayed in a community area or at community events, workshops or talks on healthy lifestyles and healthy eating. The guide is also a useful tool for generating discussions about healthy eating.

FOODcents for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (2005)

FOODcents for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Type:

Resource package

Description:

FOODcents is an education program that aims to help families save money on their groceries and to achieve a healthy diet at the same time.

The program is based on the simple fact that the foods that are healthiest are also generally the cheapest per kilo to buy - fruit and vegetables, wholegrains and cereals. Meat and processed foods actually cost more per kilo as do cakes, sweets and other 'snack' foods.

This resource package was created as part of the FOODcents for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in WA program which is an adaptation of the Health Department of WA's mainstream FOODcents program. It includes:

There is now also an online FOODcents advisor training program which consists of seven fun, easy to follow, interactive modules. The modules are designed for those without a nutrition qualification. They cover essential background information on nutrition and the FOODcents program.

Producer:

North Metropolitan Area Health Service, Perth

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
Various resources can be downloaded from: http://www.healthyfuture.health.wa.gov.au/Health_topics/ASTI-FOOD/AFC-Home.htm
Cookbook order form: http://www.healthyfuture.health.wa.gov.au/Health_topics/ASTI-FOOD/ASTI_FC-order.pdf

View website:

FOODcents program
http://www.foodcentsprogram.com.au

When to use this resource:

The FOODcents program can be run as a one-off session, or as several sessions. Activities can be run for groups or individuals, and for existing groups who already meet regularly. Community FOODcents workshops can be designed to cover topics such as healthy eating, food budgeting, cooking and a supermarket tour.

The program can be run with a healthy eating, healthy weight and physical activity focus, which enables participants to learn how to make changes to the way they spend their food budget to achieve a healthy diet and lifestyle and to save money on their food bill.

Kick the gap: let's stay healthy! (no date)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure is about encouraging people to live a long, happy and healthy life. The expression 'Kick the Gap' is referring to closing the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians. The brochure is colourful and full of helpful and achievable suggestions including:

Producer:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
Ph: (02) 6248 0644

View website:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
http://www.naccho.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is meant to be distributed widely among the population, to encourage people to adopt a healthy lifestyle. It could be given out at community events, at workshops or at information sessions.

How much sugar is in your drink? (2010)

How much sugar is in your drink?

Type:

Poster

Description:

This poster gives a pictorial representation of how much sugar can be found in some popular drinks that can be purchased at the supermarket. The amount of sugar is shown as teaspoons of sugar per 600ml of drink. The drinks are:

The message on the poster is that consuming too much processed sugar can lead to a range of complications over time including:

Producer:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
Ph: (08) 9192 6435

View website:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
http://www.kamsc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This poster can be used at community events or workshops to help people visualise how much sugar they are consuming. The poster can be used to generate discussions about what other foods have large amounts of 'hidden' sugars, and what foods and drinks can be used as more healthy alternatives.

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources (2009)

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource kit focuses on the five lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease: smoking; poor nutrition; alcohol misuse; physical inactivity; and unhealthy weight. The kit contains evidencebased tools (based on research results) to enable general health practices to assist patients to modify and/or change their lifestyles. The resources include a:

The resources use pictures to illustrate the key messages. Topics covered are:

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

A full range of Lifescripts resources have been produced specifically for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The resources can be used by Aboriginal Health Workers, general practitioners and practice nurses within general practice or in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care settings. The resources have been developed to assist health professionals address lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease with their clients.

The resources give health practitioners a way to discuss and create individual goals for their clients, and to organise support arrangements. It gives the practitioners information on:

10 out of 10 deadly health stories - nutrition and physical activity (2009)

10 out of 10 deadly health stories - nutrition and physical activity

Type:

Report

Description:

The 10 out of 10 deadly health stories - nutrition and physical activity booklet presents 10 successful nutrition and physical activity programs from NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs). Programs ranged from cooking classes (Cooking classes for diabetes program) and teaching of life skills (Healthy lifestyle and weight management program), to community based activities (Fruit and vegetable program and market garden and Building healthy communities project). Despite the diversity in health topics they all shared several features, namely all were developed and tailored to meet needs identified by the Aboriginal communities in which the ACCHSs are located, and all have taken a 'holistic' approach.

The booklet was developed, produced and distributed by the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AHMRC) of NSW and funding was provided by the Australian Department of Health and Ageing.

Producer:

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW, Surry Hills, NSW

To order copies of this resource

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW
Ph: (02) 9212 4777
Fax: (02) 9212 7211
Email: ahmrc@ahmrc.org.au

View website:

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW
http://www.ahmrc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This booklet provides an insight into running programs at a community level, and shows how even the most simple program can have a positive impact on the participants. It is useful background reading for anyone considering running health promotion programs, and can provide ideas on how to collaborate and how to identify the needs of the community.

SNAP into life (2010)

SNAP into life

Type:

Resource package

Description:

SNAP into life is an interactive and culturally appropriate game for players aged 7 and up. The game has been developed and trialled in Kimberley schools with Kimberley children and their families, with the input from the Kimberley Aboriginal community and local health and education professionals. The game is based on the popular game Snakes and Ladders, and aims to develop awareness of lifestyle health risk factors such as smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP). The game also covers basic health education topics including 'our bodies', mental health, environmental health and road safety.

During the game, players who make healthy lifestyle choices are rewarded by moving forward in the game. When they make unhealthy lifestyle choices there will be long term consequences, for instance the player will need to go to hospital or even to prison. By seeing the consequences of their actions in a game situation, it is hoped that the players will learn the importance of healthy lifestyle choices, and make the right choices as they grow up.

Producer:

Tippetts A, Kimberley Division of General Practice, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Order from: http://www.snapintolife.com.au/OrderForm.pdf
Ph: 0417 904 538
Email: justine.holmes@kdgp.com.au

View website:

SNAP into life
http://www.snapintolife.com.au

When to use this resource:

The game is suitable for all age groups, but would particularly appeal to children and teenagers. It can be used in a school setting or in a community group as a fun way to teach them about health risk factors. It can be used to illustrate lessons that have been taught in the classroom or as a lead-up to more in depth lessons.

Adults can also enjoy the game in a social group. It can be used to reinforce what they already know, as well as teaching them something new.

EON edible garden manual (2011)

EON edible garden manual

Type:

Handbook

Description:

EON Foundation has produced a user-friendly manual to assist anyone who is planning to set up an edible garden (community garden). The information is presented in an easy-to-read style and illustrated with photos from their own edible gardens.

The manual has been printed on paper that has been treated to make it untearable and washable (so it can be taken it into the garden), with a ruler printed on the inside cover to 'measure how far apart you need to plant your seedlings...'. There are chapters on:

EON Foundation works with communities in the Kimberley region of WA, and so this manual is geared towards gardens in this area. The second half of the manual is a month-by-month guide of what to plant, harvest, and do in the gardens in the coastal Kimberley and inland Kimberley regions.

Producer:

EON Foundation, Perth, WA

To order copies of this resource

EON Foundation
Ph: (08) 6313 5700

View website:

EON Foundation
http://www.eon.org.au

When to use this resource:

This manual is a useful tool for anyone setting up an edible garden or growing edible plants. The manual is especially useful for those living or working in the Kimberley region of WA, or similar climatic regions.

Getting started in community gardening: a guide to planning, design and implementation of community garden projects (2008)

Getting started in community gardening: a guide to planning, design and implementation of community garden projects

Type:

Report

Description:

This guide has been developed to assist community groups plan, design and implement a new or existing community garden project and to manage and maintain it in the long-term. It does not give detailed instructions on how to proceed, but instead discusses the issues that should be considered when planning the long-term viability of any community garden project.

The guide is based on the experience of successful community gardeners, and on research into the factors that influence the success or lack of success of community-based projects.

This resource is not Indigenous specific.

Producer:

Thomas F, Sydney

To order copies of this resource

City of Sydney
Ph: (02) 9265 9333
Email: council@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

View website:

Food Fairness Illawarra
http://www.foodfairnessillawarra.org.au/

When to use this resource:

This guide is a useful resource for helping groups to plan, design and implement a community garden project.

Physical activity

Yulunga: traditional Indigenous games (2009)

Yulunga: traditional Indigenous games

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource is a selection of games and activities from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations all around Australia. It provides an opportunity to learn about, appreciate and experience aspects of Indigenous culture. The games and activities in Yulunga: traditional Indigenous games are:

Producer:

Australian Sports Commission, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6214 1210
Email: isp@ausport.gov.au

View website:

Australian Sports Commission
http://www.ausport.gov.au

When to use this resource:

These games can be used as skill games or lead-up games in physical education lessons or in specific sport practice sessions at school or for a sporting program. When the games are used as part of a school or sporting program it is recommended that local elders and Indigenous groups are invited to participate in some way.

These games can also be used to run physical activity sessions with adults, encouraging an emphasis on participation and fun.

Sports ability: Indigenous sports ability activity cards (2006)

Sports ability: Indigenous sports ability activity cards

Type:

Resource package

Description:

These activity cards provide a unique opportunity to learn about and participate in traditional Indigenous games and sporting activities. They are easy to use and provide examples of how to modify games to cater for all skill levels. These activity cards are inclusive games for people with or without a disability and are designed for all age groups, from children to adult.

Producer:

Australian Sports Commission, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Modern Teaching Aids
Ph: 1800 251 497
Email: sales@teaching.com.au

View website:

Australian Sports Commission
http://www.ausport.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is designed for use in schools and other group settings. This resource is primarily designed for the inclusion of people with disabilities in sports but can be used within groups of people without disabilities.

Sports Ability equipment can be purchased or the activity cards can be used on their own with existing equipment.

Tucker talk tips: healthy eating and physical activity tip sheets (2010)

Type:

Factsheets

Description:

The Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), peak body for the community controlled sector in that state, and the Victorian Government, have collaboratively developed a series of 12 culturally appropriate physical activity and healthy eating factsheets, on the following topics:

Producer:

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Go for your life, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

VACCHO
Ph: (03) 9419 3350
Fax: (03) 9417 3871
Email: enquiries@vaccho.com.au

View website:

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
http://www.vaccho.org.au/

When to use this resource:

The resource is intended for people in the Victorian Indigenous community and designed to be distributed by Aboriginal Health Workers, other health professionals and Indigenous organisations. The fact sheets can be used to generate discussions on healthy eating and exercise with clients, in private consultation or in group settings.

Kick the gap: let's stay healthy! (no date)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure is about encouraging people to live a long, happy and healthy life. The expression 'Kick the Gap' is referring to closing the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians. The brochure is colourful and full of helpful and achievable suggestions including:

Producer:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
Ph: (02) 6248 0644

View website:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
http://www.naccho.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is meant to be distributed widely among the population, to encourage people to adopt a healthy lifestyle. It could be given out at community events, at workshops or at information sessions.

Feel good: eat healthy tucker & move more everyday (2010)

Feel  good: eat healthy tucker & move more everyday

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

The Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (AHMRC) and the Australian Diabetes Council (ADC) in consultation with the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in NSW have developed a DVD called Feel good: eat healthy tucker and move more everyday.

The DVD provides tips for Aboriginal communities on eating healthier and finding ways to move more everyday. It showcases healthy lifestyle programs that are currently running at two Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services - Tharawal Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) in Campbelltown and Galambila Aboriginal Health Service (AHS) in Coffs Harbour.

The first segment 'Feel good with healthy tucker' was filmed with participants of the community kitchen program at Tharawal AMS with celebrity chef Mark Olive. The second segment 'Move more everyday' was filmed with Australian futsal player Lachlan Wright and participants of the Spring into shape program at Galambila AHS.

Highlighting the participants' practical tips on eating healthier and how to become more active everyday on the DVD are positive steps towards achieving healthier lifestyles and preventing Type II diabetes for Aboriginal communities.

Each package includes:

Producer:

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of New South Wales, Diabetes Australia - New South Wales, Sydney, NSW

To order copies of this resource

AH&MRC
Ph: (02) 9212 4777
Fax: (02) 9212 7211
Email: ahmrc@ahmrc.org.au

To order a free copy of the DVD resource please contact the AHMRC Chronic Disease Program Coordinator
Amina Currimbhoy
Email: acurrimbhoy@ahmrc.org.au

View website:

Diabetes Australia
http://www.australiandiabetescouncil.com

When to use this resource:

This DVD can be used to support new or existing healthy lifestyle group activities or can be shown in individual settings to increase awareness of the benefits of a healthy diet and physical activity and how it relates to the prevention and /or management of diabetes. It is a practical and valuable educational tool for all individuals, families and those who are at risk of developing diabetes.

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources (2009)

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource kit focuses on the five lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease: smoking; poor nutrition; alcohol misuse; physical inactivity; and unhealthy weight. The kit contains evidence based tools (based on research results) to enable general health practices to assist patients to modify and/or change their lifestyles. The resources include a:

The resources use pictures to illustrate the key messages. Topics covered are:

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

A full range of Lifescripts resources have been produced specifically for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The resources can be used by Aboriginal Health Workers, general practitioners and practice nurses within general practice or in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care settings.

The resources have been developed to assist health professionals address lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease with their clients.

The resources give health practitioners a way to discuss and create individual goals for their clients, and to organise support arrangements. It gives the practitioners information on:

SNAP into life (2010)

SNAP  into life

Type:

Resource package

Description:

SNAP into life is an interactive and culturally appropriate game for players aged 7 and up. The game has been developed and trialled in Kimberley schools with Kimberley children and their families, with the input from the Kimberley Aboriginal community and local health and education professionals. The game is based on the popular game Snakes and Ladders, and aims to develop awareness of lifestyle health risk factors such as smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP). The game also covers basic health education topics including 'our bodies', mental health, environmental health and road safety.

During the game, players who make healthy lifestyle choices are rewarded by moving forward in the game. When they make unhealthy lifestyle choices there will be long term consequences, for instance the player will need to go to hospital or even to prison. By seeing the consequences of their actions in a game situation, it is hoped that the players will learn the importance of healthy lifestyle choices, and make the right choices as they grow up.

Producer:

Tippetts A, Kimberley Division of General Practice, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Order from: http://www.snapintolife.com.au/OrderForm.pdf
Ph: 0417 904 538
Email: justine.holmes@kdgp.com.au

View website:

SNAP into life
http://www.snapintolife.com.au

When to use this resource:

The game is suitable for all age groups, but would particularly appeal to children and teenagers. It can be used in a school setting or in a community group as a fun way to teach them about health risk factors. It can be used to illustrate lessons that have been taught in the classroom or as a lead-up to more in depth lessons.

Adults can also enjoy the game in a social group. It can be used to reinforce what they already know, as well as teaching them something new.

Physical activity during and after pregnancy (2009)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This resource provides information on the benefits of exercise during and after pregancy, including what kinds of exercise are appropriate and how to exercise safety during pregnancy.

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http:www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition and physical activity for mothers. It is suitable for individual or group settings. It could be left in community or health centres for people to read or take home for future guidance.

Australia's physical activity recommendations for 5-12 year olds (2004)

Australia's physical activity recommendations for 5-12 year olds

Type:

Brochure

Description:

The Department of Health and Ageing has developed physical activity recommendations for children and young people from 5-18 years of age.

This brochure provides advice on why to exercise and examples of types of exercise suitable for people aged 5-12 years of age.

It is colourfully illustrated and easy to comprehend.

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The brochure is designed to be used directly with young people, however the information may also be useful to parents and carers of young people and anyone working to promote, conduct and monitor physical activity for children and young people.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Australia's physical activity recommendations for 12-18 year olds (2004)

Australia's physical activity recommendations for 12-18 year olds

Type:

Brochure

Description:

The Department of Health and Ageing has developed physical activity recommendations for children and young people from 5-18 years of age.

This brochure provides advice on why to exercise and examples of types of exercise suitable for the age group 12-18 years of age.

It is colourfully illustrated and easy to comprehend.

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The brochure is designed to be used directly with young people, however the information may also be useful to parents and carers of young people and anyone working to promote, conduct and monitor physical activity for children and young people.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

National physical activity guidelines for adults (2005)

National physical activity guidelines for adults

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure sets out four steps that Australian adults can take to get healthier and fitter. They include:

For each step there is advice on the minimum amount of physical activity needed for a person to improve their health. There is also advice for those who are able, and wish, to achieve greater health and fitness results.

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The guidelines (steps) outlined in this brochure are not intended for high-level fitness, sports training or weight loss, only for people wanting to improve their overall health and fitness. This brochure is meant to provide adults with advice on how much physical activity is recommended to help stay healthy. It can be used for planning a physical activity program.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

10 out of 10 deadly health stories - nutrition and physical activity (2009)

10 out of 10 deadly health stories - nutrition and physical  activity

Type:

Report

Description:

The 10 out of 10 deadly health stories - nutrition and physical activity booklet presents 10 successful nutrition and physical activity programs from NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs). Programs ranged from cooking classes (Cooking classes for diabetes program) and teaching of life skills (Healthy lifestyle and weight management program), to community based activities (Fruit and vegetable program and market garden and Building healthy communities project). Despite the diversity in health topics they all shared several features, namely all were developed and tailored to meet needs identified by the Aboriginal communities in which the ACCHSs are located, and all have taken a 'holistic' approach.

The booklet was developed, produced and distributed by the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AHMRC) of NSW and funding was provided by the Australian Department of Health and Ageing.

Producer:

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW, Surry Hills, NSW

To order copies of this resource

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW
Ph: (02) 9212 4777
Fax: (02) 9212 7211
Email: ahmrc@ahmrc.org.au

View website:

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW
http://www.ahmrc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This booklet provides an insight into running programs at a community level, and shows how even the most simple program can have a positive impact on the participants. It is useful background reading for anyone considering running health promotion programs, and can provide ideas on how to collaborate and how to identify the needs of the community.

Choose health: be active: a physical activity guide for older Australians (2005)

Choose health: be active: a physical activity guide for older Australians

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This booklet is designed to help older Australians be physically active for good health as they age. It is mainly for people who are not currently getting the recommended daily 30 minutes of physical activity in their lives, and are looking for ways they can do so.

This booklet includes specific information on exercising with chronic illness and has some advice about healthy eating. It explains what the physical activity guidelines are, why physical activity is important and includes a monthy activity plan to help people get started. There are also some low intensity exercise to try; stretching and balancing exercises and some others that can be done while watching TV.

Producer:

Brown WJ, Moorhead GE, Marshall AL, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This booklet can be given to older people and their carers to read, to motivate them to be physically active and stay healthy as they age. It can be used when discussing health issues with individuals or groups of older people, and has some good ideas on how to answer people's excuses for not exercising.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Alcohol

The Grog Book revised edition (2005)

The Grog Book

Type:

Book

Description:

This book was developed for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who want to tackle the effects that grog has on their communities. The book has eight chapters on: history; alcohol; action; prevention; controls; strategies; care and handouts. For each chapter there is:

Producer:

Brady M, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing Quote code AG 42
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Australian Department of Health and Ageing: Alcohol
http://www.alcohol.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This book provides Indigenous people with ideas and strategies for managing alcohol. It tries to provide as many choices as possible for people to use. The advantages and disadvantages for each course of action are also provided. The book is based on what Indigenous people themselves have been doing in communities.

In the last chapter there are handouts that can be photocopied or put into overheads; these can be used for providing information to a community. Page 246 of the book has a list of key resources that will be useful in finding out more, or keeping up to date with new information.

Strong spirit strong mind: Aboriginal ways to reduce harm from alcohol and other drugs resources (2008)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource package provides Indigenous specific resources including a DVD and gender specific brochures about alcohol use. There are 13 brochures and one DVD in the resource package with the titles:

The brochures use a simple design with a minimum of words and plenty of colourful pictures to get across the messages they are promoting.

The DVD covers many issues relating to alcohol use including the introduction of alcohol, the new alcohol guidelines and the impact of hazardous and harmful alcohol use.

Producer:

Drug and Alcohol Office (WA)

To order copies of this resource

Currently available for distribution only within WA Drug and Alcohol Office (WA)
Ph: 1300 518 963
Online order form: http://www.health.wa.gov.au/ordering

View website:

Drug and Alcohol Office
http://www.dao.health.wa.gov.au

When to use this resource:

These brochures would be useful for giving to community members to help raise awareness of the issues of alcohol and drug use. They can also be used to generate discussions on the subjects with small or large groups of people.

The DVD provides useful background information for the Worker. Some sections of it could be used in group discussions to raise awareness of the effects of harmful use of alcohol and to discuss ways of preventing the potential effects.

Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs during pregnancy and breastfeeding (2009)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This booklet discusses why alcohol, tobacco and other drugs (legal and illegal) should be avoided during a woman's pregnancy and the breastfeeding of her baby. It outlines the health risks to both the mother and the developing baby. In addition, it highlights the harmful effect of family and friends smoking near a pregnant woman. It delivers a powerful message in a clear and easy to understand way.

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs to a pregnant woman and her baby. It is an effective resource to use with individuals or in a group meeting. It is an important resource for all families who are expecting a baby or who are wanting to have a baby. It could be left in community centres for all community members to look at, or take home.

Kick the gap: let's stay healthy! (no date)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure is about encouraging people to live a long, happy and healthy life. The expression 'Kick the Gap' is referring to closing the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians. The brochure is colourful and full of helpful and achievable suggestions including:

Producer:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
Ph: (02) 6248 0644

View website:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
http://www.naccho.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is meant to be distributed widely among the population, to encourage people to adopt a healthy lifestyle. It could be given out at community events, at workshops or at information sessions.

Talking about alcohol with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients (second edition) (2003)

Talking about alcohol with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients

Type:

Flipchart

Description:

This flipchart is a guide to doing a brief intervention with someone who is having problems with alcohol. It has been shown that a brief intervention by a health professional can help to motivate individuals to change their drinking behaviour, either by cutting down or stopping completely. A brief intervention can include:

The flipchart has prompts for the health professional on one side, with colourful, culturally appropriate illustrations for the client on the other. It also contains some useful information for the health professional on how to conduct a brief intervention and suggests important topics for discussion with clients.

The flip chart comes with a 'Safer drinking action prescription' pad where the health professional can 'prescribe' action for the client such as 'Have at least one alcohol free day each week' and 'Eat food before and while you drink'.

Producer:

Brady M, Hunter E, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Freecall: 1800 020 103

View website:

Alcohol, Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.alcohol.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The flip chart is intended for use by health professionals including Health Workers, nurses and GPs, who are assisting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with alcohol-related issues. It is a useful tool for one-on-one consultations, for conducting brief interventions with someone who is having problems with alcohol.

The prescription pad gives the client something to take away with them, to remind them of the discussion they have had and the action they have agreed to take.

No alcohol in pregnancy is the safest choice (2009)

No alcohol in pregnancy is the safest choice

Type:

Wallet card

Description:

This wallet card is designed for pregnant women and offers suggestions on how to say 'no' to alcohol when you are pregnant. The resource lists the possible effects of drinking alcohol during pregnancy and provides phone contact details of Alcohol and Drug Information Services in each state and territory.

Producer:

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth, WA

To order copies of this resource

Online order form: http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy
For bulk orders:
Email: janp@ichr.uwa.edu.au

View website:

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research
http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is a handy wallet sized card for pregnant women. It is designed for a woman to keep in her wallet so that when she is being pressured to have an alcoholic drink she has some ready answers and reasons to back up her choice.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders flipchart (2006)

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders flipchart

Type:

Flipchart

Description:

This flipchart has been developed to explain to people who may be thinking about getting pregnant, or who are pregnant, about the dangers of drinking alcohol when pregnant and the risks of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). It has been designed especially for Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Workers and Health Workers and their clients.

Topics included in the flipchart include:

Producer:

Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (SA), Adelaide

To order copies of this resource

Online store: http://www.adac.org.au/resources.php?resType=FASD

View website:

Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (SA)
http://www.adac.org.au/

When to use this resource:

This resource would be useful to use in a one-on-one consultation with clients.

The grog brain story (2009)

Type:

Flipchart

Description:

This resource is part of a series that also includes the following flipcharts:

It uses plain English language and informative images to provide straightforward and clear information about:

Producer:

Cairney S, Fitz J, Thompson S, Currie J, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne and Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin

To order copies of this resource

Sheree Cairney
Ph: 0438 121 473
Email: Sheree.Cairney@menzies.edu.au

View website:

Menzies School of Health Research
http://www.menzies.edu.au

When to use this resource:

This flipchart is designed for use by health professionals, community workers, educators, Aboriginal Health Workers, Aboriginal Mental Health Workers, drug and alcohol workers, students and community members. It can be used to accompany an alcohol treatment program, or as an educational resource. It is for use with Indigenous people in urban, rural and remote settings.

Pregnancy and alcohol don't mix (2007 est)

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders flipchart

Type:

Poster

Description:

This poster is a part of a Pregnancy and alcohol don't mix social marketing campaign in South Australia. The poster provides the message 'pregnancy and alcohol don't mix' which is supported by three statements:

Information is also provided on Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) which can affect babies who have been exposed to alcohol in the womb.

Producer:

Centre for Health Promotion, Adelaide, SA

To order copies of this resource

Centre for Health Promotion, SA
Ph: (08) 8161 7777
Fax: (08) 8161 7778

View website:

Centre for Health Promotion
http://www.chdf.org.au/

When to use this resource:

This resource is aimed at pregnant women however it would be also suited to women who are thinking of becoming pregnant. The poster would preferably be displayed in a place where many women will see it, such as a community hall, clinic or shopping centre, and can be used to promote group discussions on pregnancy and alcohol.

Kaiyai girl: an interactive film (2008)

Kaiyai girl: an interactive film

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This DVD tells the story of a young girl Missy, and her friends from Broome and the Dampier Peninsula in Western Australia. Missy and a friend attend a party and are faced with many choices in relation to alcohol and other drug use. The film then follows the girls as they come to deal with the consequences of their choices.

This story is all about making choices. It shows that the use of drugs and alcohol can affect decision making and personal control. The film seeks to highlight how alcohol and other drug use can affect decisions about being boss of your own body and keeping in control of your life.

Kaiyai girl is an interactive DVD, which means it not only tells a story, but allows the viewer to make decisions on behalf of the characters in the story. Questions are asked and participants can use their DVD remote control to answer the questions. The viewer's decisions will determine how the story ends for Missy and her friend.

The DVD runs for about 30 minutes.

Producer:

Travers H, McKeon V, Augustine P, Djiagween T, Ishiguchi N, Gamble L, HITnet, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

HITnet
Ph: (07) 4226 3204
Fax: (07) 4226 3245
Email: info@hitnet.com.au

View website:

HITnet
http://www.hitnet.com.au

When to use this resource:

This DVD is a teaching resource for use with students in early adolescence through to early adulthood. It tackles the issues of drug and alcohol use. It aims to give participants knowledge and understanding of these issues and the self management skills to cope when faced with choices about drug and alcohol use. It can be used alone or in groups where discussions can be held about the choices made and facing the consequences of those choices.

Party girl (2010)

Type:

Comic

Description:

This comic is an easy to read and entertaining story of an Indigenous woman as she learns how to resist drugs and alcohol during pregnancy. Broadly concerned with substance use this comic also touches upon the stages of pregnancy. Other themes considered include cardiovascular health, parenting and domestic violence.

Producer:

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Milliya Rumurra, Inception Strategies, Adelaide, SA

To order copies of this resource

Milliya Rumurra Aboriginal Corporation
Ph: (08) 9192 1699

View website:

Inception Strategies
http://www.inceptionstrategies.com

When to use this resource:

This comic is primarily targeting pregnant women, however it would also be a useful resource to distribute to women prior to becoming pregnant. The illustrations are simple and easy to understand and would be suitable for younger members of the community.

Making sense of Australia's alcohol guidelines (2009)

Making sense of Australia's alcohol guidelines

Type:

Factsheet

Description:

This factsheet provides clear and easy to understand information about the new National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) alcohol guidelines. Where relevant the new guidelines are compared with the previous guidelines to show where many changes have been made. It provides useful background information for health professionals as to how the new guidelines were developed, the reasons and evidence that led to the new guidelines.

Producer:

Roche AM, National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction, Adelaide

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (08) 8201 7535
Fax: (08) 8201 7550
Email: nceta@flinders.edu.au

View website:

National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction
http://www.nceta.flinders.edu.au

When to use this resource:

The fact sheet aims to help health workers understand the content and direction of the new alcohol guidelines, and to make it easier for health workers and others to apply the new guidelines in their day-to-day practice.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Reduce your risk: new national guidelines for alcohol consumption (2009)

Reduce your risk: new national guidelines for alcohol consumption

Type:

Brochure

Description:

In 2009 new national guidelines for alcohol consumption were developed by the National Health and Medical Research Council. The guidelines are based on the most current and best available scientific research and evidence. This brochure provides information on:

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing, Alcohol
http://www.alcohol.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This brochure is specifically for adults. It can be used as background information for health professionals or Health Workers or as a quick reference for health professionals when they are faced with questions from clients. It can also be used to distribute to clients or members of the community for them to keep as a reference for themselves, their friends and families.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Grog: making the change (2010)

Type:

Flipchart

Description:

This resource kit has been developed to support frontline workers across many health and community services, who are working with individuals, families and communities to address alcohol misuse.

This kit contains several resources including:

The kit addresses many alcohol related issues including:

Producer:

Northern Territory Department of Health and Families, Northern Territory Department of Justice, Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Department of Health and Ageing, Department of Health and Families Northern Territory, Darwin

To order copies of this resource

Alcohol & Other Drugs Program Top End
Ph: (08) 8999 2400

View website:

Department of Health and Families, Northern Territory
http://www.health.nt.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This kit can be used as an educational resource when conducting individual or group sessions with people who have problems or are at risk for problems with alcohol. It can also be used as a preventative tool for youth, and can be used as a screening tool to determine if someone has a problem that should be referred to a health professional.

The tools provided can be used together or on an individual basis, across a variety of local, rural and remote settings.

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources (2009)

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource kit focuses on the five lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease: smoking; poor nutrition; alcohol misuse; physical inactivity; and unhealthy weight. The kit contains evidence-based tools (based on research results) to enable general health practices to assist patients to modify and/or change their lifestyles. The resources include a:

The resources use pictures to illustrate the key messages. Topics covered are:

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

A full range of Lifescripts resources have been produced specifically for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The resources can be used by Aboriginal Health Workers, general practitioners and practice nurses within general practice or in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care settings. The resources have been developed to assist health professionals address lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease with their clients.

The resources give health practitioners a way to discuss and create individual goals for their clients, and to organise support arrangements. It gives the practitioners information on:

SNAP into life (2010)

SNAP  into life

Type:

Resource package

Description:

SNAP into life is an interactive and culturally appropriate game for players aged 7 and up. The game has been developed and trialled in Kimberley schools with Kimberley children and their families, with the input from the Kimberley Aboriginal community and local health and education professionals. The game is based on the popular game Snakes and Ladders, and aims to develop awareness of lifestyle health risk factors such as smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP). The game also covers basic health education topics including 'our bodies', mental health, environmental health and road safety.

During the game, players who make healthy lifestyle choices are rewarded by moving forward in the game. When they make unhealthy lifestyle choices there will be long term consequences, for instance the player will need to go to hospital or even to prison. By seeing the consequences of their actions in a game situation, it is hoped that the players will learn the importance of healthy lifestyle choices, and make the right choices as they grow up.

Producer:

Tippetts A, Kimberley Division of General Practice, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Order from: http://www.snapintolife.com.au/OrderForm.pdf
Ph: 0417 904 538
Email: justine.holmes@kdgp.com.au

View website:

SNAP into life
http://www.snapintolife.com.au

When to use this resource:

The game is suitable for all age groups, but would particularly appeal to children and teenagers. It can be used in a school setting or in a community group as a fun way to teach them about health risk factors. It can be used to illustrate lessons that have been taught in the classroom or as a lead-up to more in depth lessons.

Adults can also enjoy the game in a social group. It can be used to reinforce what they already know, as well as teaching them something new.

Smoking

Talkin' up good air: Australian Indigenous tobacco control resource kit (2007)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource kit provides information, ideas, activities, success stories, and reference materials on tobacco control for Indigenous Australian communities. It aims to assist health professionals, in particular Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers, to become community leaders in the area of tobacco control and to raise the importance of tobacco control in Indigenous communities. The kit also encourages community action and aims to build community ownership in tobacco control by supporting community-initiated and controlled action.

Producer:

Kruger K, McMillan N, Russ P, Smallwood H, Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Tobacco Control, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

Email: ceitc-info@unimelb.edu.au

View website:

Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Tobacco Control
http://www.ceitc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is designed as a comprehensive reference for health professionals to use when working in the area of tobacco control.

Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs during pregnancy and breastfeeding (2009)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This booklet discusses why alcohol, tobacco and other drugs (legal and illegal) should be avoided during a woman's pregnancy and the breastfeeding of her baby. It outlines the health risks to both the mother and the developing baby. In addition, it highlights the harmful effect of family and friends smoking near a pregnant woman. It delivers a powerful message in a clear and easy to understand way.

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs to a pregnant woman and her baby. It is an effective resource to use with individuals or in a group meeting. It is an important resource for all families who are expecting a baby or who are wanting to have a baby. It could be left in community centres for all community members to look at, or take home.

Kick the gap: let's stay healthy! (no date)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure is about encouraging people to live a long, happy and healthy life. The expression 'Kick the Gap' is referring to closing the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians. The brochure is colourful and full of helpful and achievable suggestions including:

Producer:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
Ph: (02) 6248 0644

View website:

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
http://www.naccho.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is meant to be distributed widely among the population, to encourage people to adopt a healthy lifestyle. It could be given out at community events, at workshops or at information sessions.

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources (2009)

Lifescripts: Indigenous resources

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource kit focuses on the five lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease: smoking; poor nutrition; alcohol misuse; physical inactivity; and unhealthy weight. The kit contains evidence-based tools (based on research results) to enable general health practices to assist patients to modify and/or change their lifestyles. The resources include a:

The resources use pictures to illustrate the key messages. Topics covered are:

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1000
Email: health@nationalmailing.com.au

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

A full range of Lifescripts resources have been produced specifically for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The resources can be used by Aboriginal Health Workers, general practitioners and practice nurses within general practice or in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care settings. The resources have been developed to assist health professionals address lifestyle risk factors for chronic disease with their clients.

The resources give health practitioners a way to discuss and create individual goals for their clients, and to organise support arrangements. It gives the practitioners information on:

SNAP into life (2010)

SNAP  into life

Type:

Resource package

Description:

SNAP into life is an interactive and culturally appropriate game for players aged 7 and up. The game has been developed and trialled in Kimberley schools with Kimberley children and their families, with the input from the Kimberley Aboriginal community and local health and education professionals. The game is based on the popular game Snakes and Ladders, and aims to develop awareness of lifestyle health risk factors such as smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP). The game also covers basic health education topics including 'our bodies', mental health, environmental health and road safety.

During the game, players who make healthy lifestyle choices are rewarded by moving forward in the game. When they make unhealthy lifestyle choices there will be long term consequences, for instance the player will need to go to hospital or even to prison. By seeing the consequences of their actions in a game situation, it is hoped that the players will learn the importance of healthy lifestyle choices, and make the right choices as they grow up.

Producer:

Tippetts A, Kimberley Division of General Practice, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Order from: http://www.snapintolife.com.au/OrderForm.pdf
Ph: 0417 904 538
Email: justine.holmes@kdgp.com.au

View website:

SNAP into life
http://www.snapintolife.com.au

When to use this resource:

The game is suitable for all age groups, but would particularly appeal to children and teenagers. It can be used in a school setting or in a community group as a fun way to teach them about health risk factors. It can be used to illustrate lessons that have been taught in the classroom or as a lead-up to more in depth lessons.

Adults can also enjoy the game in a social group. It can be used to reinforce what they already know, as well as teaching them something new.

Diabetes

Pregnancy and diabetes (2009)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This resource stresses the importance of regular health checks for women who have diabetes when they are pregnant. It looks at the risk factors for developing gestational diabetes and the steps women can take to look after their health during a pregnancy including; a healthy diet and drinks, physical activity and weight control.

Producer:

Queensland Health, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Brochures are only available to those working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in Queensland.
Order form: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growingstrong_order.pdf
If you are not from Queensland you can download the PDF of these brochures from:
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph/documents/hpu/growing_strong.asp

View website:

Queensland Health, Population Health
http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ph

When to use this resource:

This resource is part of the Growing strong: feeding you and your baby set of resources developed by Queensland Health to help health staff talk with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families about nutrition for mothers who develop diabetes during pregnancy. It is useful for pregnant women and women who are considering pregnancy.

Diabetes it's in your hands (2008)

Type:

Factsheet

Description:

This set of diabetes factsheets were produced to support Aboriginal Health Workers and improve health outcomes for Aboriginal Australians. This series of factsheets on diabetes covers topics including:

The factsheets are clearly presented with easy to understand instructions and tips.

Producer:

Diabetes Australia Vic, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
The PDF can be downloaded from:http://diabetesvic.org.au/images/stories/PDF_files/ATSI_Insulin.pdf?phpMyAdmin=fsgZ8MzPBx-Okd83pnoO%2CvcNPM5

View website:

Diabetes Australia Vic
http://www.diabetesvic.org.au

When to use this resource:

These factsheets on diabetes have been specifically created for Aboriginal Health Workers and health professionals to use with their Indigenous clients.

Live now and have hope for the future (2009)

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This booklet is a collection of quotes from Indigenous people about diabetes and is part of the diabetes campaign Don't ignore diabetes. It aims to change the current negative talk surrounding diabetes, to give hope to people suffering from the chronic disease and move the focus on diabetes to a belief that the disease can be prevented or delayed. The booklet shares comments of local Aboriginal community members living with diabetes, and members who have a family history of diabetes.

It also highlights how health professionals can help people to prevent and manage diabetes, and provides a list of phone contact details for health services in the Perth metropolitan region.

Producer:

Diabetes WA, Perth

To order copies of this resource

Diabetes WA
Ph: (08) 9325 7699
Online order form: http://www.dontignorediabetes.com.au/Order_Resources

View website:

Diabetes WA
http://www.diabeteswa.com.au

When to use this resource:

This resource was developed for Indigenous people and provides information on diabetes and diabetes support. It can be used to generate discussion during a group workshop or information session, to show clients how diabetes can be managed and to give them a positive attitude to living with and managing their own diabetes. The booklet can also be used to give to individuals for their own information and to share with their families.

Live now and have hope for the future (2009)

Type:

Poster

Description:

This poster is Indigenous-specific and carries the message 'Live now and have hope for the future'. It is a promotion poster for the Don't ignore diabetes health campaign. The poster gives contact details for the campaign website where people can get further information on the disease.

Producer:

Diabetes WA, Perth

To order copies of this resource

Diabetes WA
Ph: (08) 9325 7699
Online order form: http://www.dontignorediabetes.com.au/Order_Resources

View website:

Diabetes WA
http://www.diabeteswa.com.au

When to use this resource:

This poster can be displayed in medical health service centres or community centres for people to be made aware of the contact details for information on diabetes and the support they can receive to manage, prevent or delay the disease.

How much sugar is in your drink? (2010)

How much sugar is in your drink?

Type:

Poster

Description:

This poster gives a pictorial representation of how much sugar can be found in some popular drinks that can be purchased at the supermarket. The amount of sugar is shown as teaspoons of sugar per 600ml of drink. The drinks are:

The message on the poster is that consuming too much processed sugar can lead to a range of complications over time including:

Producer:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
Ph: (08) 9192 6435

View website:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
http://www.kamsc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This poster can be used at community events or workshops to help people visualise how much sugar they are consuming. The poster can be used to generate discussions about what other foods have large amounts of 'hidden' sugars, and what foods and drinks can be used as more healthy alternatives.

Sharing solutions: Indigenous communities tackling chronic disease (2010)

Sharing solutions: Indigenous communities tackling chronic disease

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This DVD aims to help health professionals respond in more effective ways to the health and wellbeing needs of Indigenous adults. It looks at successful community-based primary healthcare programs that focus on prevention and health promotion. It also examines community-based plans that have been successful in reducing Indigenous health disadvantage. The program stresses an important message about closing the gap in life expectancy. The gap cannot be closed unless chronic disease issues are given special attention and dealt with in a way that gives Indigenous people independence, cultural identity and community responsibility.

The program discusses projects that are making a difference: The family wellbeing program at Yarrabah in Queensland; a diabetes self-management program developed by the Far North Queensland Rural Division of General Practice and currently run by Apunipima Cape York Health Council; and the Chronic care program developed by Dharah Gibinj Aboriginal Medical Service in Casino, NSW

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This resource could be used with health professionals to educate them in chronic disease factors affecting Indigenous people, and the potential answers or solutions to tackling this.

Live strong: closing the gap on chronic disease (2010)

Live strong: closing the gap on chronic disease

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This program focuses on the need for a comprehensive plan for the prevention, treatment and management of chronic disease. It also explains the Indigenous notion of health and explores how this might shape more effective intervention programs. The program stresses that the gap in life expectancy cannot be closed unless chronic disease issues are addressed in a way that values independence, cultural identity, and community responsibility.

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This documentary program is suitable for use by health professionals in health promotion and communication activities. It could be played to community groups or distibuted to individuals wishing to gain a greater insight into chronic disease.

Kidney health

Risks of kidney disease (2006)

Risks of kidney disease

Type:

Poster

Description:

This colourful poster provides a very brief overview of the risk factors of kidney disease including:

Producer:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
Ph: (08) 9192 6435

View website:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
http://www.kamsc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource could be displayed at community events or at workshops. It could also be distributed to people at risk of chronic kidney disease. It can be used to generate discussions about how to reduce the risks of kidney disease and can be used to encourage participants to talk about their own experiences.

Stages of kidney disease (no date)

Stages of kidney disease

Type:

Poster

Description:

This poster outlines the stages of kidney disease with easy to read captions and simple illustrations. The stages illustrated are:

Information is included on the risk factors and treatment options for chronic kidney disease.

Producer:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
Ph: (08) 9192 6435

View website:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
http://www.kamsc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource could be displayed at community events or at workshops. It could also be distributed to people at risk of chronic kidney disease. It can be used to generate discussions about how to reduce the risks of kidney disease and can be used to encourage participants to talk about their own experiences.

Kidney care (no date)

Kidney care

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This booklet provides a comprehensive but easy to understand overview of kidney disease. Combining colourful illustrations with simple text this booklet covers:

Producer:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
Ph: (08) 9192 6435

View website:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
http://www.kamsc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This booklet could be used with any person at risk of kidney disease or as a means of educating the wider community on kidney disease. It can also provide useful background information to the health professional.

Good kidney health (no date)

Good kidney health

Type:

Poster

Description:

This colourful poster lists the protective behaviour that people can undertake to keep their kidneys healthy. This includes:

Producer:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council, Broome, WA

To order copies of this resource

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
Ph: (08) 9192 6435

View website:

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Council
http://www.kamsc.org.au

When to use this resource:

This poster could be displayed in a prominent community area, at a community event or workshop, or distributed to people at risk of developing kidney disease. It can be used to generate discussion about how to keep kidneys healthy.

Big girls don't cry (2002)

Big girls don't cry

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This resource looks at kidney disease and the impact it has on the sufferers and their families, both culturally and emotionally. It consists of three clips. Clip one uses a series of interviews intercut with photographs that tell the story of Mariah, a young baby, and the effect of kidney disease on her and her family. During the clip a doctor provides information about kidney disease. The second clip is Mariah as a young girl living an active life after a kidney transplant. Mariah's parents talk about what is required to support Mariah in living with her condition. The doctor tells us that after a transplant, patients need to take medicine everyday so that their body does not reject the new kidney. The final clip shows a renal ward in Darwin. Dr Paul Snelling, the director of Northern Territory Renal Health, tells us about the impact of renal disease on Indigenous peoples and their communities. Glenda Kerinaiau shares her experience with living with dialysis.

The video is well presented with clear messages about kidney disease and the lifelong health and emotional impact they have on Indigenous people and their families.

Producer:

Ballangarry D, CAAMA Productions, Alice Springs

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6248 0851
Fax: (02) 6249 1640
Email: orders@roninfilms.com.au

View website:

CAAMA Productions
http://caama.com.au

When to use this resource:

This a valuable resource for health professionals or educators working with Indigenous people in remote, rural or urban communities or schools. It is relevant for all age groups as a means of highlighting the impact chronic kidney disease has on sufferers and their families.

Live strong: closing the gap on chronic disease (2010)

Live strong: closing the gap on chronic disease

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This program focuses on the need for a comprehensive plan for the prevention, treatment and management of chronic disease. It also explains the Indigenous notion of health and explores how this might shape more effective intervention programs. The program stresses that the gap in life expectancy cannot be closed unless chronic disease issues are addressed in a way that values independence, cultural identity, and community responsibility.

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This documentary program is suitable for use by health professionals in health promotion and communication activities. It could be played to community groups or distibuted to individuals wishing to gain a greater insight into chronic disease.

Heart health

My heart my family our culture (consumer resource kit) (2011)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource package has been created by the Heart Foundation specifically for Indigenous people. It contains four separate items to inform people about how to look after their hearts:

Producer:

National Heart Foundation of Australia, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Heart Foundation WA
Ph: (08) 9382 5924
Fax: (08) 9388 3383

View website:

National Heart Foundation of Australia
http://www.heartfoundation.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource package can be handed out to people at community events, workshops or educational sessions. The items can be used to generate discussion on topics such as heart attack warning signs, or personal stories. The recipe book can illustrate a discussion on healthy eating or recipes can be chosen to use in a demonstration or cooking class.

My heart my family our culture (health professional resource kit) (2011)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource kit for health professionals contains five Indigenous specific items containing information about risk factors and warning signs of cardiovascular disease (CVD):

Although all items are about the same topic, they contain different levels of information, so the health professional can choose the resource to suit their audience. The information booklet is designed to provide background information to the health worker, and the other resources are designed to show to members of the general public while providing detailed explanations.

Producer:

National Heart Foundation of Australia, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Heart Foundation WA
Ph: (08) 9382 5924
Fax: (08) 9388 3383

View website:

National Heart Foundation of Australia
http://www.heartfoundation.org.au

When to use this resource:

The flipcharts could be used in a small group setting or with individuals to talk in depth about CVD, the risk factors and warning signs. The posters could be displayed at community events, in an office, a health centre or a community centre. They could be used to generate discussions about the warning signs of a heart attack or to advertise a talk. The information booklet is more for use by a health worker to provide themselves with more background information on CVD, the risk factors and warning signs.

Activities to do on communities when recovering from a heart attack (2010)

Activities to do on communities when recovering from a heart attack

Type:

Leaflet

Description:

Activities to do on communities when recovering from a heart attack is a leaflet of practical advice and an activity plan. The activity plan begins with a recommendation for slow walking 5-10 mins for the first week, and gradually builds up to longer and more strenuous activities for the patient. For example, by week 6 the activity plan includes long walks, collecting shellfish from rocks, swimming, digging for honey ants.

This activity plan has been specifically designed for people living in rural or remote communities, as some of the activities are bush activities.

The leaflet also includes some information on why exercise is important, and when to seek medical advice.

Producer:

Healthy Living NT, Casuarina, NT

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
The PDF can be downloaded from: http://www.healthylivingnt.org.au/content/?id=84

View website:

Healthy Living NT
http://www.healthylivingnt.org.au

When to use this resource:

This leaflet is for people who are recovering from a heart attack or their carers. It can be used to provide ideas for physical activity with a client, (they may not like to do all the activities suggested) and to make them aware that they should not try to do anything too strenuous when they are recovering.

Activities to do on communities when recovering from heart surgery (2010)

Activities to do on communities when recovering from heart surgery

Type:

Leaflet

Description:

Activities to do on communities when recovering from heart surgery is a leaflet of practical advice and an activity plan. The activity plan begins with a recommendation for slow walking 5-10 mins for the first week, and gradually builds up to longer and more strenuous activities for the patient. For example, by week 6 the activity plan includes long walks, collecting shellfish from rocks, collecting pandanus, swimming (if your chest wound is OK), digging for honey ants.

This activity plan has been specifically designed for people living in rural or remote communities, as some of the activities are bush activities.

The leaflet also includes some information on why exercise is important, and when to seek medical advice.

Producer:

Healthy Living NT, Casuarina, NT

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
The PDF can be downloaded from: http://www.healthylivingnt.org.au/content/?id=84

View website:

Healthy Living NT
http://www.healthylivingnt.org.au

When to use this resource:

This leaflet is for people who are recovering from heart surgery or their carers. It can be used to provide ideas for physical activity with a client, (they may not like to do all the activities suggested) and to make them aware that they should not try to do anything too strenuous when they are recovering.

Sharing solutions: Indigenous communities tackling chronic disease (2010)

Sharing solutions: Indigenous communities tackling chronic disease

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This DVD aims to help health professionals respond in more effective ways to the health and wellbeing needs of Indigenous adults. It looks at successful community-based primary healthcare programs that focus on prevention and health promotion. It also examines community-based plans that have been successful in reducing Indigenous health disadvantage. The program stresses an important message about closing the gap in life expectancy. The gap cannot be closed unless chronic disease issues are given special attention and dealt with in a way that gives Indigenous people independence, cultural identity and community responsibility.

The program discusses projects that are making a difference: The family wellbeing program at Yarrabah in Queensland; a diabetes selfmanagement program developed by the Far North Queensland Rural Division of General Practice and currently run by Apunipima Cape York Health Council; and the Chronic care program developed by Dharah Gibinj Aboriginal Medical Service in Casino, NSW

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This resource could be used with health professionals to educate them in chronic disease factors affecting Indigenous people, and the potential answers or solutions to tackling this.

Live strong: closing the gap on chronic disease (2010)

Live strong: closing the gap on chronic disease

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This program focuses on the need for a comprehensive plan for the prevention, treatment and management of chronic disease. It also explains the Indigenous notion of health and explores how this might shape more effective intervention programs. The program stresses that the gap in life expectancy cannot be closed unless chronic disease issues are addressed in a way that values independence, cultural identity, and community responsibility.

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This documentary program is suitable for use by health professionals in health promotion and communication activities. It could be played to community groups or distibuted to individuals wishing to gain a greater insight into chronic disease.

Other resources

This section contains information about more resources that may be useful to you as a Healthy Lifestyle Worker, but are not contained in your resource pack.

A story about feeding babies (2005)

Type:

Flipchart

Description:

This flipchart is about food for babies. It covers ages from birth to six months, six months to one year, and over one year. It provides key messages for each of these age groups. This resource stresses the importance of breastfeeding throughout this period, and describes foods and drinks that are not good for babies/infants to eat in each of the age groups.

The flipchart uses colour pictures and photos to illustrate the key messages. Remote community members were invited to give advice on the flipchart content and layout, making it more relevant for people in these communities.

Producer:

Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services, Darwin

To order copies of this resource

Nutrition and Physical Activity Program, NT
Ph: (08) 8985 8021

View website:

Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services
http://www.health.nt.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This flipchart has been developed to help illustrate to mothers what foods are best for their babies. It can be used by individuals, or for group information sessions in Indigenous communities. It can be used to illustrate the message being taught, and to promote discussion among mothers about their breastfeeding and infant feeding experiences, challenges and strategies.

Feeding your mob with fruit & veg: bush tucker tips (2008)

Feeding your mob with fruit & veg: bush tucker tips

Type:

Booklet

Description:

The Feeding your mob recipes booklet is based on the fruit and veg cookbook put together by the former Mid North Coast Aboriginal Partnership.

The booklet has many popular and nutritious fruit and vegetable recipes, including pictures to show how to prepare the recipes in a fun and easy way. The recipes include 'bush tucker tips' so that Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people can become familiar with foods that have been part of the Aboriginal diet for many years, and maybe try some of these traditional ingredients when preparing Aboriginal food.

The recipes in this booklet are very economical to make, and use a variety of fresh, dried, canned and frozen fruit and vegetables.

Producer:

Mid North Coast Aboriginal Health Partnership, The 2 & 5 Campaign, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
The PDF can be downloaded from: http://admin.gofor2and5.hstprdweb01.perthix.net/DataStore/files/pdf/NSW/Feeding%20your%20mob.pdf

View website:

The 2 & 5 Campaign
http://www.gofor2and5.com.au

When to use this resource:

The recipes in this booklet can be used when running cooking classes, to show examples of how economical, healthy and tasty meals can be created using a variety of ingredients that are easily obtained. The recipes can be shared with members of the community to take home and try themselves, thereby encouraging them to practice at home the skills they have learned in a class or group setting.

The detailed descriptions of the bush tucker ingredients can be used to encourage discussion on traditional foods and traditional cooking, and a healthier way of life.

The flour-drum stove cookbook for easy outdoor cooking for families (2009)

Type:

Booklet

Description:

The Flour-drum stove cookbook is a collection of recipes that can be prepared in the flour-drum stove.

The flour-drum stove was invented by nutritionist Roy Price as a simple system for cooking healthier foods, for those people who did not have the appropriate cooking facilities or equipment in their houses. It is an alternative for those people who buy a lot of convenience or fast foods from their local store.

Outdoor cooking using the flour-drum stove gives large numbers of community members a chance to take part in the cooking process. Cooking even simple meals in the flour-drum stove can help to improve the health of members by reducing the amount of unhealthy take-aways they buy. Maintaining a healthy weight can assist with prevention of diabetes and other chronic conditions.

The recipes in this cookbook use ingredients that can be purchased in most locations, and are simple, tasty and healthy.

This method is intended only as a short term solution while housing and infrastructure problems are experienced in remote Aboriginal communities.

Producer:

Price R, Nutrition & Physical Activity section Northern Territory Department of Health and Families, Darwin

To order copies of this resource

Northern Territory Department of Health and Families
Ph: (08) 8985 8017

View website:

Department of Health and Families, Northern Territory Government
http://www.health.nt.gov.au

When to use this resource:

Flour-drum stove nutrition education activities can be used to promote:

The recipes can also be made in conventional kitchens using standard equipment.

Tomorrow people (2008)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource package is part of the Australian better health initiative's Measure up campaign, a joint federal, state and territory health initiative. Tomorrow people focuses on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can be healthier and live longer. The website has information about how people can improve their health by making a few simple changes to eating habits, and by being more active in daily life. This information includes:

There are posters and radio interviews with well-known Indigenous sports people and media personalities, and a booklet that promotes the messages on the website.

Producer:

Australian Better Health Initiative, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
The booklet and posters can be downloaded and the advertorials and interviews can be viewed online at:
http://www.measureup.gov.au/internet/abhi/publishing.nsf/Content/tomorrow+resources-lp

View website:

Tomorrow people
http://www.measureup.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This resource package has been created to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people understand the importance of, and the way to a healthy lifestyle. The posters, with pictures of Rohanee Cox and Mark Olive, can be used to highlight the message that a healthy diet and regular physical activity can help lead to a healthy body. The radio interviews with other Indigenous media personalities can help to inspire people to be more healthy like their role models. The website contains information for people at all stages of life and includes recipes, and a recommendation for people to talk to their doctors.

Healthy pregnancies, healthy babies for Koori communities (2007)

Type:

Flipchart

Description:

Healthy pregnancies, healthy babies for Koori communities is a flipchart developed by the Victorian Department of Health.

It covers a range of topics including:

Each section provides clear and easy to understand information on the topic with the flipside showing a diagram or photos to illustrate the key ideas for the topic.

Producer:

Victorian Department of Health, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

Victorian Drug and Alcohol Prevention Council
Ph: (03) 9096 0378 or 1300 253 942

View website:

Victorian Department of Health
http://www.health.vic.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The flipchart was designed to be used by Aboriginal Health Workers, maternal and child health nurses, midwives, GPs and other health service providers who work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, their families and communities. It takes a holistic approach and states that it is the responsibility of the whole community to support the health and wellbeing of pregnant women.

Quick meals for Kooris (2008)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This resource package relates to Quick meals for Kooris, a 'hands-on' cooking program that was designed to assist urban Aboriginal people to cook healthy meals for the family. The program is delivered in two three-hour sessions and is very flexible and versatile. The program aims to make meal preparation enjoyable and achievable. This is important if participants are to put what they have learned into practice at home. The participants in the program will gain practical knowledge and skills which will help them and their families to eat nutritious food.

This kit contains:

Producer:

Harris J, Leahy J, Bunney C, Anderson M, Central Coast Health NSW, Sydney

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 4320 3691

View website:

Central Coast Health NSW
http://www.healthpromotion.com.au

When to use this resource:

Quick meals for Kooris is designed to be run by Aboriginal Health Workers or by Aboriginal community members who are trained to deliver the program. The group leader does not need extensive nutrition knowledge, just some basic home cooking skills and knowledge of their local community. The cooking program can be run as a 'stand alone' program or included in larger programs, including those that address diabetes, heart disease, living on a budget, working with youth, community gardens, vacation care etc.

Leaping lizards, little garden / big change: growing a community with a simple seed (2010)

Type:

Book

Description:

The Leaping lizards, little garden/big change book provides a comprehensive account of the creation of the Onslow organic school community garden, which led to the creation of the Onslow community garden next door.

The Onslow organic school community garden was born out of a need to improve the quality of the food at the Onslow school canteen, and the need for fresh ingredients for the newly formed Breakfast club. The school garden grew a variety of fruit and vegetables that were used in the canteen and breakfast club, but also became the place for school based and youth holiday programs teaching children and young people the importance of a healthy diet. The garden was also used as an outdoor classroom to teach subjects like science, environmental health and cooking.

The success of the school garden inspired the development of the Onslow community garden. The community garden was designed to be a meeting place, a place to engage in recreation and sport, health and healing, a place for family gatherings, barbeques, festivities and events.

The book is divided into five sections:

Producer:

Leaping Lizards Onslow project, Onslow, WA

To order copies of this resource

Pilbara Health Network
Ph: (08) 9185 6662
Fax: (08) 9185 6664

View website:

Pilbara Health Network
http://www.phn.org.au

When to use this resource:

This book provides a useful account of how a community garden was created. It can be used to provide ideas on how to go about establishing gardens in other areas. The tips on gardening, the learning activities and the recipes can be used separately or as part of a community garden initiative.

Growing food for healthy communities: a workbook for Aboriginal communities (2006)

Growing food for healthy communities: a workbook for Aboriginal communities

Type:

Handbook

Description:

This handbook that has been co-produced with a DVD, that demonstrates how communities can grow their own fruit and vegetables for healthy nutrition. Presented in the form of a story, the book follows the Warrel family as they make improvements to their home and property. Topics covered include:

Producer:

Byrne J, Anda M, Remote Area Developments Group, Murdoch, WA

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
A pdf can be downloaded from the HealthInfoNet website from: http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/uploads/resources/18724_18724.pdf

View website:

Josh Byrne and Associates
http://www.joshbyrne.com.au

When to use this resource:

This booklet aims to provide practical information that may be useful to Indigenous communities interested in growing their own fresh fruit and vegetables. It can be used to guide the creation of community gardens which are an excellent source of low-cost fresh fruit and vegetables, as well as providing exercise for those working in the gardens.

The booklet is also linked to training modules so it can be used as part of other training programs such as the Certificate of Horticultural Skills (Aboriginal Communities) and Certificate II Australian Land Conservation and Restoration.

It's your life, so make the most of it: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (no date)

It's your life, so make the most of it: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This nine page booklet designed by the Queensland Government has large, colourful pictures and brief descriptions. The aim of the booklet is to encourage Indigenous people to eat healthy foods and be physically active to enable them to live healthy lives and reduce their risk of chronic disease.

The booklet includes information on:

Producer:

Find Your 30, Queensland Department of Communities, Brisbane

To order copies of this resource

Ph: 1300 656 191
Email: your30@communities.qld.gov.au

View website:

Find Your 30
http://www.your30.qld.gov.au

When to use this resource:

This resource can be used with all members of the community as it covers male, female and child/adolescent health. It is designed for people who have perhaps thought about making healthy changes to their lives but have not yet made any significant changes. The booklets can be distributed at community events, workshops or information sessions.

Mangarri palya (cooking good food) (2010)

Type:

Book

Description:

This recipe book is a collection of recipes developed during the Mangarri palya community cooking and nutrition project. The project focused on running training for community cooking leaders, running community events, and promoting nutrition and healthy lifestyles in the four western desert communities of Kintore, Mt Liebig, Papunya and Ikuntji in the NT.

In each community, local cooking leaders worked with the Mangarri palya project worker to create recipes, some old favourites for the community and some new. These recipes have been collected and used to create a cook book which is simple to use and packed with photos and illustrations.

Producer:

Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi Aboriginal Corporation, Central Australia

To order copies of this resource

Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi Aboriginal Corporation
Ph: (08) 8953 4488

View website:

Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi Aboriginal Corporation
http://www.waltja.org.au

When to use this resource:

This recipe book can be used as a starting point from which to run healthy cookup activities which engage and educate young people and adults, both men and women. Cooking can take place outdoors on gas stoves, to demonstrate equipment available to people who do not have working stoves, and also inside available community kitchens. The events should involve training in basic food preparation and hygiene.

Our pathway to living longer (no date)

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This booklet provides a detailed overview of nutrition, diabetes and cardiovascular health. It provides an explanation of technical terms in simple language with accompanying illustrations.

Topics include:

Producer:

Western Australian Department of Health, Kidney Health Australia, Perth, WA

To order copies of this resource

Not available in hardcopy.
The PDF can be downloaded from: http://www.kidney.org.au/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=cn1H64hfF3o%3d&tabid=770&mid=1755

View website:

Kidney Health Australia
http://www.kidney.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource is an educational tool to use with people with chronic health conditions. It can also be used to educate the wider community. It contains some sample meal plans which could be distributed to people trying to change their eating patterns.

First taste: how Indigenous Australians learned about grog (2008)

First taste: how Indigenous Australians learned about grog

Type:

Booklet

Description:

Maggie Brady, a social anthropologist from the Australian National University, has written a series of short books called First taste, which explore the social history of alcohol use in Australia. The series of six booklets investigates the factors that have been a foundation for Indigenous drinking habits. The booklets provide a complete analysis of the history relating to the introduction of alcohol to Indigenous Australians. The topics covered by the booklets include:

Producer:

Brady M, Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation (AER), Deakin West, ACT

To order copies of this resource

AER Foundation Ltd
Ph: (02) 6122 8600
Online shop: https://aerf.evolveshop.com.au/epages/aerf.sf

View website:

Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation
http://www.aerf.com.au

When to use this resource:

This resource can be used to give Indigenous people an understanding of how history has played a role in the current levels of alcohol drinking. It is applicable to all age groups and settings (rural, urban or remote). It is provides useful background information to anyone working in the area of Indigenous health and alcohol use.

Drinking for two? (2007)

Drinking for two?

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This DVD of the program Drinking for two? addresses the question 'Is it safe to drink at all when you're pregnant?' Individuals experiencing this problem, their families and a panel of health experts have got together to discuss this question and offer their stories. Case studies are used to illustrate the issues for children, adults and Indigenous communities. Drinking for two? is a short version of program 614 Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, which was first broadcast in 2006.

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This resource has been produced for children, adults and Indigenous communities to look at the issues surrounding drinking during pregnancy.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service education resource package (no date)

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This diabetes resource kit has been put together to support teachers who wish to teach students to identify and prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. This health promotion kit which carries messages about lifestyle choices aims to make a difference in health outcomes for students.

The boxed kit contains:

The kit is available by mail order from Durri Aboriginal Medical Service.

Producer:

Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service, Kempsey, NSW

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6560 2300
Fax: (02) 6562 3371
Email: dt2kit@durri.org.au
Order form: http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/uploads/resources/16336_education-resourcepackage-order-form.pdf

View website:

Durri Aboriginal Medical Service
http://durri.yolasite.com

When to use this resource:

This resource kit is for school-based diabetes programs. It will provide teachers and staff involved in health promotion, with tools to structure lessons with an effective and informed health perspective. It is aimed at school students from years 5-8, as well as those in a tertiary setting, as this is a time in students' lives when they are making decisions and forming attitudes which will carry them into adulthood.

Feltman (2010)

Feltman

Type:

Resource package

Description:

Feltman is a diabetes education tool developed by Diabetes Australia - Vic to teach Aboriginal people about diabetes management and the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

This new diabetes educational resource is a felt mat that can be either laid out on a flat surface or hung up. It is in the shape of the human body and shows the systems and organs relating to diabetes. Using the stick-on felt pieces, Aboriginal Health Workers can show their patients or community groups how insulin works in the body.

Feltman comes with an instructional DVD and cards.

Producer:

Diabetes Australia Vic, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (03) 8648 1833
Email: cmitchell@diabetesvic.org.au

View website:

Diabetes Australia Vic
http://www.diabetesvic.org.au

When to use this resource:

Feltman can be used by health workers with individuals or groups, in demonstrations or interactive workshops. The particular advantage of the Feltman is that it is life-sized, enabling people to better visualise the body parts in their own bodies.

How's your sugar? (2010)

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This website was developed for Indigenous people by Indigenous people. The aim of the website was to provide information on living well for people with type 2 diabetes.

The website uses 'ordinary people' who discuss their challenges and successes, describing the practical truths they face, rather than just providing diabetes management information.

Based on the idea that diabetes, even though it is a medical condition, is also a social and cultural experience, the use of narrative (speaking) is vital to the web page, in the same way that narrative is important as a cultural method of sharing knowledge in communities.

Producer:

Australian Community Centre for Diabetes, Victoria University, Melbourne

To order copies of this resource

How's your sugar?
http://www.howsyoursugar.com.au/#/kitchen

View website:

Victoria University
http://www.vu.edu.au

When to use this resource:

This resource could be a useful point of information for people who are concerned about type 2 diabetes. It can be used by individuals who have access to a computer and the Internet, and its simplicity makes it suitable for most people in the community.

It can also be used as a simple tool for showing to groups of people, at a workshop or talk, to highlight important messages. These may include: the value of family and community support in managing your diabetes; and the factors that may make diabetes management more difficult, but not impossible.

Diabetes: it's in my hands (no date)

Type:

Factsheet

Description:

This is a series of factsheets on diabetes. Each factsheet uses colourful pictures and everyday language to explain what diabetes is and how it can impact on a person's life. They also provide tips on how to manage the disease and how to enjoy a healthy and active lifestyle. Topics covered by the factsheets include:

Producer:

Australian Diabetes Council, Sydney

To order copies of this resource

Ph: 1300 136 588

View website:

Australian Diabetes Council
http://www.australiandiabetescouncil.com

When to use this resource:

This diabetes resource is a series of culturally appropriate factsheets which have been created for the Indigenous community. Community members may like to take them home to read, or may like to discuss the information with a health professional or Health Worker who can explain the information in more detail. The factsheets could be handed out at workshops or be made available in diabetes clinics.

The diabetes story: living a healthy and long life with well controlled diabetes (no date)

The diabetes story: living a healthy and long life with well controlled diabetes

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

The Diabetes story is a health information movie which has five scenes or chapters which cover the following topics:

The movie plays in Flash and is available in three Central Australian languages (Pitjantjatjara, Warlpiri, Arrernte), as well as English.

Producer:

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, Alice Springs

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (08) 8958 3664
Email: promotions@caac.org.au

View website:

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress
http://www.caac.org.au

When to use this resource:

This movie can be used as a diabetes educational tool and is very useful for people who do not understand many medical terms dealing with diabetes. It can be used to provide background information to practitioners and Health Workers, as well as for use with Aboriginal clients in a group education session or for individual consultation.

Bush tucker in kidney failure and diabetes (2007)

Type:

Booklet

Description:

This booklet is designed to assist those living with diabetes and kidney failure. It provides details of the nutritional value of 326 different types of bush tucker, including a selection of more common bush tucker eaten in rural and remote regions. Bush tucker is listed under the following categories:

The nutritional value for each food is set out in tables with details provided on how to understand the symbols used in the tables.

The booklet is designed to assist dietitians and patients in making appropriate choices.

Producer:

Renal Resource Centre, Northern Sydney Central Coast NSW Health, NSW

To order copies of this resource

Aboriginal Studies Press
Ph: (02) 6246 1186
Email: asp@aiatsis.gov.au

For a copy free of charge
Ph: (02) 9362 3995
Ph: 1800 257 189

View website:

Kidney Health Australia
http://www.kidney.org.au

When to use this resource:

This guide is written especially for people with chronic kidney disease who wish to eat Indigenous foods. This resource can be used by dietitians and their clients.

Kidney health education - have a health check (2007)

Type:

Poster

Description:

This series of five posters provide bright and simple illustrations of core health messages including:

Producer:

Kidney Health Australia, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Kidney Health Australia
Ph: (03) 9674 4300
Email: info@kidney.org.au

View website:

Kidney Health Australia
http://www.kidney.org.au

When to use this resource:

These posters could be displayed at prominent community locations to raise people's awareness of kidney health or to generate discussion on ways to keep kidneys healthy.

Koori kidneys need kindness (2001)

Type:

Brochure

Description:

This brochure provides a basic overview of kidney disease under three major headings:

Information is also provide on places where people can find more information on kidney disease.

Producer:

New South Wales Department of Health, Sydney

To order copies of this resource

Kidney Health Australia
Ph: (03) 9674 4300
Email: info@kidney.org.au

View website:

Kidney Health Australia
http://www.kidney.org.au

When to use this resource:

This resource can be distributed to people who have kidney disease or those at risk of developing it.

Circulation and our heart (no date)

Circulation and our heart

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

The DVD covers the topics of circulation and the action of the heart, including the role of heart valves. This information is vital for understanding a wide range of illnesses including cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, such as stroke, heart failure and rheumatic heart disease. The DVD has two chapters:

Chapter 1: Circulation - Gulan nuli ga marrtji liw'maram limurrungal rumbalkurr, includes:

Chapter 2: Inside our heart - Djinaga' limurrungal doturrknur, includes:

Producer:

Aboriginal Resource and Development Services, Winnellie, NT

To order copies of this resource

Online shop: http://www.ards.com.au/www.ards.com.au/store_health.htm

View website:

Aboriginal Resource and Development Services
http://www.ards.com.au

When to use this resource:

This educational DVD was specifically designed for Aboriginal Health Workers, but will also be useful viewing for community members and/or patients. The information is provided in Yolnu Matha with English subtitles and can be used to increase the understanding of a wide range of cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses.

Rheumatic heart disease: all but forgotten (2008)

Rheumatic heart disease: all but forgotten

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

Aboriginal people living in the Top End of the Northern Territory have recorded the highest incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in the world. This DVD raises the awareness of health professionals to population groups within Australia at risk of rheumatic heart disease (RHD), and examines strategies developed jointly by the National Heart Foundation and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand for best practice to address the treatment, control and eradication of ARF and RHD.

After watching this DVD the health professional should be aware of the following:

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

This DVD provides useful background information for the health professional who would like to learn more about rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

Rheumatic fever (2007)

Type:

Audiovisual

Description:

This DVD aims to reduce the incidence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in Indigenous Australians by educating young Aboriginal people about rheumatic fever, the risks to their health, and how to prevent those risks. The message is delivered by high profile Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a manner that will appeal to young Indigenous Australians. The DVD runs for approximately six minutes.

Producer:

Rural Health Education Foundation, ACT

To order copies of this resource

Ph: (02) 6232 5480
Fax: (02) 6232 5484
Email: rhef@rhef.com.au

View website:

Rural Health Education Foundation
http://www.rhef.com.au

When to use this resource:

The resource is designed to be shown to young Aboriginal people to make them aware of rheumatic heart disease. It can be used in clinics, schools and communities throughout Australia. It can be used to stimulate discussions with students about how to prevent RHD.

Building healthy communities - a guide for community projects (2004)

Building healthy communities - a guide for community projects

Type:

Resource package

Description:

This guide has been put together to help people running projects to address chronic disease in small rural communities. This guide is part of the Building healthy communities project.

The guide covers the main areas of managing a project under three sections:

It includes information on preparing a funding submission, planning the project and its evaluation, getting people involved, running the project and sustaining the project once the funding has ended. Examples are given throughout each stage to help. This includes what the projects have achieved, how they were done, some of the problems faced and what was learnt.

There is an extra section on evaluation called 'More on evaluation'. To give further help on undertaking evaluation this section includes a step-by-step guide to evaluation planning, collecting and analysing the information and presenting results.

Producer:

Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra

To order copies of this resource

National Mailing & Marketing
Ph: (02) 6269 1080

View website:

Department of Health and Ageing
http://www.health.gov.au

When to use this resource:

The publication is a guide for people in small rural communities who want to try new ways to make a difference in managing chronic disease at a local level. It is useful as background information for any person wanting to develop a project targetting chronic disease in a small rural community, who has little or no experience in this area.

This is not an Indigenous specific resource.

 
Last updated: 21 October 2014
 
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