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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin Alcohol and other drugs knowledge centre Yarning Places
 
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spacing1What do we know about tobacco use among Indigenous people?

Smoking tobacco is a major cause of:

Passive smoking (breathing in another person's tobacco smoke) also contributes to poor health, particularly for children.

The proportion of Indigenous adults who smoke declined significantly between 2002 and 2012-2013 (from 51% to 43%), but smoking was still more than twice as common among Indigenous adults than among non-Indigenous adults in 2012-2013 [2][3]. According to the 2008 NATSISS, two-out-of-three Indigenous current daily smokers had tried to quit in the previous year [3].

In 2008, around one-in-six Indigenous children 0-3 years and one-quarter of Indigenous children 4-14 years lived with someone who usually smoked inside the house [4][5].

Around one-quarter of Indigenous adults were living with someone who usually smoked inside the house [6].

Tobacco use was responsible for one-in-five deaths among Indigenous people in 2003 [7].

References

  1. Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (2012) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health performance framework: 2012 report. Canberra: Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Department of Health and Ageing
  2. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2004) National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2002. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics
  3. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey: updated results, 2012–13: table 10 smoker status by age, Indigenous status and sex [data cube]. Retrieved 6 June 2014 from http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/subscriber.nsf/log?openagent&472705500610.xls&4727.0.55.006&Data%20Cubes&848805EF76A00F55CA257CEE0010D8F0&0&2012%9613&06.06.2014&Latest
  4. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2009) National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey, 2008; Table 09. Indigenous children aged 0-3 years, by state or territory of usual residence [data cube]. Retrieved from http://abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/SUBSCRIBER.NSF/log?openagent&47140do009_2008.xls&4714.0&Data%20Cubes&CAAA9C3AC720772ACA25765E001541A1&0&2008&30.10.2009&Previous
  5. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2010) National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social survey, 2008: Table 11. Indigenous children aged 4-14 years, by sex [data cube]. Retrieved 21 April 2010 from http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/SUBSCRIBER.NSF/log?openagent&4714.0_aust_011_2008.xls&4714.0&Data%20Cubes&F3D13C41FD47C376CA25770B0016F79E&0&2008&21.04.2010&Previous
  6. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2010) The health and welfare of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, Oct 2010. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics
  7. Vos T, Barker B, Stanley L, Lopez A (2007) The burden of disease and injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2003. Brisbane: Centre for Burden of Disease and Cost-Effectiveness, University of Queensland
 
Last updated: 17 June 2015
 
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