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Report released: Australian burden of disease study: fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010

Date posted: 10 April 2015

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has recently released their second report in the Australian burden of disease study series. This report provides estimates of the fatal burden for 2010 for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, as well as estimates the gap in fatal burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Around 3,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people die each year, resulting in almost 100,000 years of life lost due to premature death, according to the report, Australian burden of disease study: fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010. Fatal burden is calculated in terms of years of life lost (YLL) due to deaths occurring earlier than expected.

Injuries and cardiovascular diseases contributed the most fatal burden for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (22% and 21% respectively), followed by cancer (17%), infant and congenital conditions (10%), gastrointestinal diseases (6%) and endocrine disorders (which includes diabetes) (5%). These disease groups accounting for 82% of all Indigenous YLL in 2010.

Deaths in infants contributed the most to Indigenous YYL. The burden in Indigenous infants was largely due to infant and congenital conditions, with includes causes such as pre-term birth complications, birth trauma and congenital defects.

In 2010, the rate of fatal burden experienced by Indigenous Australians was 2.6 times the rate of fatal burden experienced by non-Indigenous Australians. YLL rates for injuries and cardiovascular disease were almost three times as high in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Rates for endocrine disorders, and kidney and urinary diseases were eight and seven times the rates for non-Indigenous Australians.

The AIHW will release a more comprehensive report on the burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2016, covering fatal and non-fatal burden for specific causes, as well as the burden attributable to selected health risk factors.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

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Last updated: 13 April 2015
 
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