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Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin

Dog problems a risk to bush community health

Date posted: 22 August 2013

The federal Coalition has promised to spend $1.7 million on animal management programs in the Northern Territory to address issues of dog overpopulation and resulting illnesses.

Remote Aboriginal communities, such as Maningrida, about 500 kilometres east of Darwin and with a population of more than 2,000 people, are facing serious issues due to out of control dog populations. Local resident Steve Cole stated that dogs in the community outnumber people, with up to 100 animals a street. Dr Geoff Stewart, who is based at the Maningrida health clinic, says dog health is affecting the overall health of the community.

'If animal health is well looked after, then we see improvements in human health,' he said.

Shadow Indigenous Affairs Spokesman Nigel Scullion says animal management charity, Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC), will be paid to desex and treat tens of thousands of dogs and euthanise sick and unwanted animals in remote communities, in an attempt to control local dog populations and improve the health and well-being of both animals and local residents.

Source: ABC News


Last updated: 23 August 2013
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